DuelMasters Rules and Spoiler

Discussion in 'Random Topic Center' started by TheDeuce, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. TheDeuce

    TheDeuce New Member

    The spoiler for DuelMasters "Base Set" can be found here:

    http://zone251.hypermart.net/DMSpoiler.txt

    This is supposed to be a fully translated spoiler, and all of the names, powers, etc... are supposed to be the same as what the english cards will say. Although, I did not translate the cards, and I have no idea where my sources got the English card list from. So, I'm not going to say that the spoiler is 100% correct

    I do know however, that all of the cards from the Japanese "base" set are there.

    ------------

    And now, onto the rules. These are supposed to be the rules straight from the English Rulebook, but again, I haven't seen it, so I can't say how accurate it is. Although, it does tell the Rules of the game, so here it goes...


    Learning to Play Duel Masters

    Your duelist training begins with the quick start foldout included in the starter box. Grab the foldout, the two starter decks, the two playmats, and a friend. That’s all you need to get going.

    Don’t read any further until you’ve learned the basics!

    Rules
    Set Up
    Both players do the following things to set up for a game:
    1. Shuffle your deck.
    2. Take 5 cards from the top of your deck, but don’t look at them. Put them in a row in front of you face down. These face-down cards are your shields.
    3. Draw 5 cards from the top of your deck.
    4. Determine who goes first.

    How to Win
    Attack the other player’s shields with your creatures. When the other player has no shields left, attack him one more time to win!

    Turn Order
    1. Start your turn.
    Don't do anything during this step of your turn if you don't have any "tapped" creatures in the battle zone or tapped cards in the mana zone. Tapper cards are cards that you turned sidewanys on a previous turn to show you used them for something. You won't usually have any tapped cards until you have already played a couple turns of the game.
    If you have an tapped cards, untap them now to show that you get to use those cards again this turn.
    2. Draw a Card.
    Important! The person who plays first skips drawing a card on his first turn. This is a rule that wasn’t explained on the quick start foldout.
    Drawing a card means taking it from the top of your deck and putting it into your hand.
    As soon as you draw the last card of your deck, you lose.
    3. Put 1 card into your mana zone.
    You can put only 1 card (of any type) into your mana zone from your hand each turn, unless a spell or effect allows you to put more. You don’t have to put a card into your mana zone if you don’t want to. There's no limit to the number of cards you can have in tour mana zone.
    Put the card into your mana zone upside down so that you can read its mana number.
    Cards in your mana zone can get mana for you. Mana is like money. You use it to pay for creatures and spells.
    Important! Cards in your mana zone can’t do anything but give you mana. Ignore all text on them except for their mana numbers.
    4. Summon creatures and cast spells.
    If you want to, you can summon any number of cards during this step. You can do these things in any order.

    How to play a spell card
    Choose a spell card from your hand. The cost for a spell is in the upper left corner. If you can’t pay the cost, you can’t cast the spell.
    You pay a spell’s cost by tapping cards in your mana zone for mana. At least 1 of the mana must be the same civilization as the spell.
    Example: To cast a nature spell card that costs 4, tap at least 1 nature card in your mana zone. The other 3 cards you tap may be of any civilization.
    After you pay for a spell, do what it says. If you can't do everything it says, that's okay. Just do as much as you can. Then put the spell into your graveyard. Keep your graveyard face up next to your deck.

    How to summon a creature
    Choose a creature from your hand. The cost for a creature is in the upper left corner. If you can’t pay the cost, you can’t summon the creature.
    You pay a creature’s cost by tapping cards in your mana zone for mana. At least 1 of the mana must be the same civilization as the creature.
    After you pay for a creature, put it into the battle zone. There's no limit to the number of creatures you can have in the battle zone.
    Important! Creatures can’t attack on the turn that you put them into the battle zone because they have summoning sickness. They will be able to attack on your next turn.

    How to summon an evolution creature
    An evolution creature is a special kind of creature that will be introduced in the first Duel Masters expansion. Summoning an evolution creature works just like summoning a regular creature except you can summon an evolution creature only when you have the correct race of creature already in the battle zone. The evolution creature tells you what race of creature you need to have.

    Once you summon an evolution creature, put it on top of the creature it "evolves" from. Leave that creature underneath the evolution creature, but ignore it. Only the evolution creature’s name, abilities, color, and power matter.

    Evolution creatures don't get summoning sickness even if the creature they evolved from had summoning sickness, so you can attack immediately after you put them into the battle zone.

    There’s no limit to the number of evolution creatures you can put on top of each other.

    You can’t ever evolve another player’s creature, even in multiplayer games.

    If an evolution creature is in play, it and the card it evolved from count only as one card. As soon as the pile ends up somewhere other than the battle zone, they are seperate cards again. So if a spell makes you put your evolution creature into your mana zone, you get that many seperate cards in your mana zone.

    5. Attack.
    You can attack with your creatures in the battle zone. You can’t attack with creatures you just put into the battle zone this turn, because they have summoning sickness. (Remember that evolution creatures are special and don't get summoning sickness.)
    As many of your creatures as you want can attack each turn. Choose one, have it attack, choose another one, have that one attack, and so on.
    Tap a creature you want to attack with and say what you want to attack. It can attack your opponent or one of his tapped creatures in the battle zone.
    When a creature taps to attack, you don’t have to tap cards in your mana zone, too. Once you’ve paid to summon a creature, you don’t have to pay to have it attack.

    Attacking your opponent
    When one of your creatures attacks your opponent and it isn't blocked, it "breaks" one of your opponent's shields. That means you choose one of those shields. Your opponent then picks up that shield and puts it into his hand.

    When your opponent has no shields left, If one of your creatures attacks him one more time, you win the game.

    Some creatures can break more than one shield when they hit your opponent. They say “double breaker.”

    Important! If your opponent has fewer shields than your attacking creature can break, your creature doesn't knock out your opponent, just however many shields are left. Attacking a tapped creature

    When one of your creatures attacks one of your opponent's tapped creatures in the battle zone and isn't blocked, then the creatures battle.

    Each creature has a power number located in its lower left corner. The creature with the higher power wins the battle. The loser's owner puts it into his graveyard. If the creatures have the same power number, then both creatures go to their owner's graveyards. Some creatures have "+" after their power. This means the creature's power can get bigger because of something in the creature's text box. Make sure to read what it says!

    Attack effects
    Some of the creatures in upcoming sets have extra effects when they attack. When you want one of your creatures to attack, choose which creature you want to attack with, tap it, and choose what it's attacking. Then do any effects that happen because that creature is attacking. After that, your opponent can choose blockers.

    Blocking an attack
    Only creatures with the “blocker” ability can get in the way to stop creatures from attacking what the attacking player wants them to attack.

    You can use one of your “blocker” creatures to stop any attack. When your creature blocks, you have to tap it, so it can only block if it's untapped. Summoning sickness doesn't stop a creature from being able to block.

    When a creature blocks, it battles the attacking creature. The attacking creature can’t attack what it was going to attack (your opponent or another creature), because it must now battle the blocker.

    The creature with the higher power wins the battle. The other creature's owner puts it into his graveyard. If the creatures have the same power, then both creatures go to their owner's graveyards. Some creatures have "+" after their power. This means the creature's power can get bigger because of something in the creature's text box. Make sure to read what it says!

    Order of attack steps
    What happens first can sometimes matter during an attack. The following rules talk about the order in which things happen.

    When you tap your creature to attack your opponent, do any effects that say they happen "when this creature attacks." Then, if your oppoent doesn't block, follow any other instructions on your creature that apply. Then break shields (or win if no shields are left).

    When two creatures battle, first follow any instructions on your creature that apply. Then your opponent follows any instructions on his creature that apply. Then compare the powers of the two creatures. If one creature’s power is lower, put it in its owner's graveyard. If the powers are the same, put both creatures in their owner's graveyards. Then follow any card instructions that apply after the battle.

    6. End of turn
    Tell your opponent you’re done. Now it's your opponent's turn! Continue taking turns until one of you wins.



    Keywords
    Some cards have special abilities that are just one or two words. These “keywords” abilities appear on the card with descriptions that reminds you of what they do. There are currently 5 keyword abilities.

    - Blocker
    Each of your creatures that has "blocker" can stop the attacks of your opponent’s creatures. As long as it's untapped, you can use it to get in the way when your opponent attacks you or one of your creatures. Simply say you want to have your creature block, and then it taps and battles the attacker. Whatever your opponent's creature was originally attacking is safe!

    - Double breaker
    Each of your creatures that has "double breaker" breaks 2 shields (one at a time) each time it attacks your opponent and isn't blocked. If only 1 shield remains, it destroys just that 1 shield and you must have one of your creatures hit the player again to win the game.

    - Power attacker
    Creatures that have "power attacker" get more powerful when they attack. Simply add the “power attacker” number to the creature's power during its attack. For example, a creature that has power 3000 and “power attacker +2000” has 5000 power during it's attacks. Whenever you see a "+" after a creature's power, make sure o read the card to find out how its power can get bigger!

    - Shield trigger
    As soon as you put a spell that has "shield trigger" from the shield zone into your hand, you may cast it without paying it's cost. This is the only type of spell that you can cast during your opponent's turn. You can also decide just to keep the spell in your hand. You can then cast it during any of your turns as usual by paying its cost.

    - Slayer
    Creatures that have "slayer" are very deadly in battle. When one of these creatures battles another creature, the other creature is put into its owner's graveyard even if that creature wins the battle.

    Building Your Own Deck
    One of the great things about the Duel Masters game is that you get to build your own deck. You can build your deck however you like, as long as you follow these simple rules:

    1. Your deck must have at least 40 cards in it.
    2. Your deck can have, at most, 4 copies of any card.

    It’s tricky to build a good deck, but a good way to start is by picking 2 or 3 colors to include in it. Put in mostly creatures, since you can’t win without them.

    You should probably include a mixture of cards with low costs and cards with high costs. If you play with all big creatures, the other player will quickly overrun you with small creatures. If you play with all small creatures, the other player will drop a big creature or two and stop you in your tracks.

    After you build a deck, play it a lot. Replace cards that don’t help you or that you can rarely play. Keep working on your deck and soon you’ll be able to out-duel all your opponents. Remember, the best part of trading card games is that you can put any card you want into your deck, so start experimenting!

    Playing with More Than 2 Players
    You can play a Duel Masters game with a whole group of your friends! Each player uses his own deck! Sit around a table together and use the special rules in this section.

    Master Rules
    - Take turns clockwise around the table.
    - Your creatures can attack only your opponents directly to your left and right. When you defeat an opponent, you’ll then be able to attack the next opponent around the table.
    - You can play spells on any player and on any player’s creatures, even if you can’t attack that player.
    - You can’t block attacks on another player or on another player’s creatures.
    - Each time you defeat an opponent, you get to add a card to your shields as a reward. Take the top card of your deck and put it face down (without looking at it) into your shield zone.

    Free-For-All variant
    In this type of game, you’re on your own. You win if everyone else is defeated before you are.

    Team variant
    - In this type of game, you’re part of a team. Each team should have the same number of players.
    - Sit between two members of the other team. Your team wins if all the players on the other team are defeated.
    - In a team game, when you defeat an opponent, you’ll be able to attack the next opponent around the table. But that opponent won’t be able to attack you if one of your team members is between the two of you. The opponent will have to attack your team member.



    Does this seem like a Magic/Pokémon hybrid to anyone else? :x
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2004
  2. mysterioustrainer

    mysterioustrainer New Member

    Its like Magic except it doesn't have instants or as many different rules. Shields are unique though.
     
  3. Joe Monkey

    Joe Monkey New Member

    Its like a lot of things 0_0
     
  4. Tails

    Tails New Member

    Evolution? That's interesting...

    So, instead of YGO being the hybrid, it looks like DM, huh? 40 card decks? But that's so SMALL...

    And what about the Decking rule? It doesn't say anything... Granted, at this point, it doesn't seem likely, but you never know...
     
  5. mysterioustrainer

    mysterioustrainer New Member

    Like Magic the minimum has to be forty cards. For Magic the average deck is about 60 cards, no doubt this will be the same.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2004
  6. TheDeuce

    TheDeuce New Member

    It says in rule #2 under Turn Order, "As soon as you draw your last card, you lose"
     
  7. bullados

    bullados <a href="http://pokegym.net/forums/showthread.php?

    I kinda wish they had organized the list a little better, like the Pokemon list (rares, Uncommons, Commons, seperated into Spells and Creatures, alphabetically) to make it a little easier to red.
     

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