Guide to the Pokegym.net CaC Forum (and How to Create Fake Text Cards) v.3.3

Discussion in 'Create-A-Card' started by MegaVelocibot, Oct 25, 2005.

  1. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Guide to the Pokegym.net CaC Forum
    (and How to Create Fake Text Cards)
    an Ongoing Work in Progress by MegaVelocibot​

    NOTE: PLEASE KEEP ALL COMMENTS ON THE THREAD IN THIS LINK. Basically, if you aren't me (which you probably aren't), don't post here. I'll be trying to seek action about having any non-me posted removed from this thread. All comments posted on this thread will be ignored in all aspects except for me either asking you or an admin to remove it. Thank you.

    v.3.3: Stickied at some point!? Hooray! Author footnotes added in response. (02/20/08)
    v.3.2: Relocation to secondary unclogged thread. (10/25/05)
    v.3.1: Addition of FF7 Pokémon and Special Counters section, addition of Pokémon-ex rule, addition of the LSCF Section, addition of comments thread, in process of adding legal mechanics to Section 2 (Prefixes, Suffixes, and other Mechanics), beginning of Owners (Trainers and Teams) (adding as Section 3, will be bumping the rest down by one Section), addition of Sections 9 and 10 (Major CaC Sets and Kudos) (10/25/05)
    v.3.0: (In)Famous section added, need revised Sonic rubric from Carrington388 PMed to me still (10/24/05)
    v.2.1: Minor Organization Issues Being Taken Care Of (5/19/05)
    v.2.0: Significant Update, Addition of Sonic-Related Game Mechanics To Post 1 And Addition of Multiple Pokegym.net Prefixes and Suffixes to Post 2 (5/18/05)
    v.1.0: Original Posting (4/11/05)

    I have received a request for a guide for fake card guidelines, so here I go, in an attempt to post a good one. This will be an ongoing effort. In this guide, I host a vast amount of information for usage in this forum. If you've been directed here by someone, you most likely will want to reference Section 5 (Proper Attack Grammar Guidelines) or Section 6 (Lucanian Standard Card Format (LSCF)). If you're looking for inspiration, feel free to drift through Section 2 (Prefixes, Suffixes, and Other Mechanics), Section 3: (Owners (Trainers and Teams)), or Section 4 (Special Counters). Who knows... if you make big enough a name for yourself in this forum (good or bad), you may find your work referenced here!

    Originally, this was meant to just catalog mechanics used on the CaC forum, but now, it is becoming a massive project to attempt to encapsulate game mechanics, both real and fake!

    Index:
    Section 1: Types and Multi-Prize Pokémon
    Section 2: Prefixes, Suffixes, and Other Mechanics
    Section 3: Owners (Trainers and Teams)
    Section 4: Special Counters
    Section 5: Proper Attack Grammar Guidelines
    Section 6: Lucanian Standard Card Format (LSCF)
    Section 7: Well Known CaCers in the Pokegym.net Forum (Coming Soon)
    Section 8: (In)Famous Often-Quoted CaC References
    Section 9: Major CaC Sets
    Section 10: Kudos


    ~-o-~

    Section 1: Types and Multi-Prize Pokémon

    Section 1 Index:
    . . Types:
    . . . . Classic Types
    . . . . Neo Types
    . . . . Nintendo Types
    . . . . Ultima Types
    . . Multi-Prize Mechanics:
    . . . . Pokémon ex
    . . . . Pokémon-!!
    . . . . . . Pokémon SP
    . . . . . . Pokémon XXX
    . . . . . . Pokémon DS
    . . . . . . Pokémon XA
    . . . . . . Pokémon XD

    Types:

    Classic Types - noun, coined by LorakLucan (from Classic, meaning original) - Fighting (F), Fire (R), Lightning / Electric (L), Water (W), Grass (G), Psychic (P), and Colorless (C), types introduced by the Base Set of the Pokémon Trading Card Game (TCG). Inexperienced neophytes sometimes say Fire is (F) and Electric is (E), but such is not the case.

    Neo Types - noun, coined by LorakLucan (from Neo, meaning new) - Dark (D) and Metal (M), types introduced by the Neo expansion. These types are well known by players for the Special Energy cards that both fuel their attacks and provide beneficial effects to the Pokémon of the same type as the Energy.

    Nintendo types - noun, coined by LorakLucan (from Nintendo, something I hope needs no explanation. Okay, it's the Japanese company that now prints these cards and also makes video gmaes and some consoles.) - Fighting (F), Fire (R), Lightning (L), Water (W), Grass (G), Psychic (P), Colorless (C), Dark (D) and Metal (M), all types currently legal in the TCG. Nintendo's term for these are basic Energy types, because these types also represent all the different forms of basic Energy. However, some may be represented by Special Energy cards, which leads to minor rulings confusion. IN short, if a card provides "all types of Energy, ut only X at a time", it provides X Energy of Nintendo types.

    Ultima types - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (from Ultimate, meaning über) - Bug (B), Flying (Y), Ground (N), Rock (O), Poison (S), Ghost (H), Ice (I) , and Dragon (A), new TCG types, created in his set EX: Ultima, based upon the GB types. This set was the first on pokegym.net to feature each Pokémon as a card, all in one set, quite a feat as you would if you have spent as much time in the CaC forum as me... They tend not to be popular by many people on the forum due to the amount of confusion from all types of Energy being basic Energy (Dark and Metal too!), and the complication of game play that ensues. These, of course, are Pokegym-created types.

    Other types show up in the Prefixes section. They include Rainbow (X), Angel (T), Peace (E), and Quick (Q).

    Pokémon-ex:
    Nintendo: "Pokémon-ex are a stronger form of Pokémon, with a special drawback: when your opponent defeats your Pokémon-ex, he or she gets to draw two Prize cards, instead of one." ... "These rare characters may be difficult to find but are well worth the search. The Pokémon-ex posses remarkable battle powers that add a new element to every trainer's deck."
    Lorak Lucan: Okay, Pokémon-ex, also known as Pokémon ex. Stronger Pokémon that if it is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 2 Prizes instead of 1. These were introduced in EX: Ruby / Sapphire.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of ex.
    HP: Pokémon's normal HP + about 20 to 30 HP, except in rare occasions of Pokémon with very high GB HP (see Blissey ex, Wailord ex)
    Weaknesses: Usually 2 for Stage 2, most of the time 1 for Basic and Stage 1 with lower HP.
    Resistance: Normal if it has one, or it may not have one.
    Retreat Cost: normal or 1 more than normal.
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Attacks usually provide more effects or damage than what one would pay for, on the extent from slightly broken to seemingly broken.

    Pokémon-ex Rule: "If Pokémon-ex is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 2 Prizes instead of 1."

    Pokémon-!!:
    Pokémon-!! is a term I coined back in my set "LLC: Dawns and Dusks {Expansion the First}". It was named after a state of exclamation at the brokenness of multi-prize dynamics conceived at the Pokegym.net forums. Not actually a Pokémon with a rule, Pokémon-!! are Pokémon that, when Knocked Out, your opponent draws 3 or more Prizes. These Pokémon include Pokémon SP, Pokémon XXX, Pokémon DS, Pokémon XA, and Pokémon XD. A minor side note, but all Pokémon-!! documented here are creations of the Pokegym CaC forum.

    Pokémon SP - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after Nintendo Game Boy Advance SP) - (description from Pokémon SP contest) 3 Prizes for KO. One card with specific name per deck (like Shining Pokémon from Wizards). See below for detailed description.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of SP.
    HP: 2x Pokémon's normal HP, ±30 HP
    Weaknesses: Sometimes 2, usually 3
    Resistance: Normal if it has one.
    Retreat Cost: normal or 1 more than normal.
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: 1.5x strength of Pokémon-ex.

    Pokémon SP Rule: "You may only have one Pokémon SP in your deck. If Pokémon SP is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 3 Prizes instead of 1."

    Pokémon XXX - noun, coined by dragonspy900 (name origins unknown) - (description from a post) 3x HP, 3x Base damage, 3x Energy Cost for attacks, 3x Retreat Cost and 3 prizes for KO. See below for detailed description.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of XXX.
    HP: 3x Pokémon's normal HP
    Weaknesses: Normal
    Resistance: Normal if it has one.
    Retreat Cost: 3x Normal.
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: 3x strength of normal Pokémon, attack costs are 3x normal amount.

    Pokémon XXX Rule: "If Pokémon XXX is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 3 Prizes instead of 1."

    Pokémon DS - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after Nintendo DS) - (description from Pokémon DS contest) 4 Prize cards for KO. One per deck (like Pokémon (*) from Nintendo). See below for detailed description.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of DS.
    HP: usually normal x 2.5-2.75, but can be up to 3x.
    Weakness: 3 (if it is x2.5 HP) or 4 (if it is x2.75 or x3 HP).
    Resistance: 1 or 2 (sometimes 3)
    Retreat Cost: normal plus 1 or 2(use your best judgement). Minimum Retreat Cost of (C)(C)(C).
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: 1.5x strength of SP.
    Pokémon DS Rule: "You may only have one Pokémon DS in your deck. If Pokémon DS is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 4 Prizes instead of 1."


    Pokémon XA - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after XArgh, PenguinMaster's catch phrase) - (description from Pokémon XA contest) KO 2 of your Pokémon to play it, 5 Prize cards for KO. One per deck (like Pokémon (*) from Nintendo). See below for detailed description.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of XA.
    HP: 4-4.5x normal HP.
    Weakness: They have 4x Weakness to two distinct types that have some relation to the type(s) it is (example Golem XA might have a weakness of (G)(G)(W)(W).
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: Greater than 5, making it near impossible to retreat (except w/ Switch, etc.)
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Usually something like 100 damage per Energy card with extraordinary effects.
    Pokémon XA Rule: "Knock Out 2 of your Pokémon in play in order to play this card. When Pokémon XA is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 5 Prizes instead of 1."


    Pokémon XD - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after XD emoticon) - (description from Pokémon XD contest) 6 Prize cards for KO. Not to be confused with the Gamecube game Pokémon XD (Xtra Dimension). See below for detailed description.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of XD.
    HP: 5-5.5x normal HP.
    Weakness: it has 5, one of which is a double weakness.
    Resistance: about 2.
    Retreat Cost: usually 3 or 4 more then normal.
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Brokenness scale is like 2x DS, maybe slightly more or less.
    Pokémon XD Rule: "When Pokémon XD is Knocked Out, your opponent draws 6 Prizes instead of 1. If you and your opponent are in Match Play, and Pokémon XD is Knocked Out, your opponent wins 2 games instead of 1."
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2008
  2. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 2: Other Pokémon Prefixes and Suffixes
    (See bottom of post for day of last update)

    Section 2 Index: (listed in Alphabetical Order)
    Prefixes, Suffixes, and Other Mechanics
    . . Prefixes
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Prefixes
    . . . . . . Dark Pokémon
    . . . . . . Light Pokémon
    . . . . . . Shining Pokémon
    . . . . . . (other) Pokémon
    . . . . Pokegym-Used Prefixes
    . . . . . . Angel Pokémon
    . . . . . . Dream Pokémon
    . . . . . . Inferno Pokémon
    . . . . . . Inverse Pokémon
    . . . . . . Lucanian Pokémon
    . . . . . . Mystic Pokémon
    . . . . . . Peace Pokémon
    . . . . . . Quick Pokémon
    . . . . . . Rainbow Pokémon
    . . . . . . Reversal Pokémon
    . . . . . . Sacrifice Pokémon
    . . . . . . Shadow Pokémon
    . . . . . . Spectrum Pokémon
    . . . . . . Über Pokémon
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Suffixes
    . . . . . . Pokémon (*)
    . . . . Pokegym-Used Suffixes
    . . . . . . Double-Type Pokémon
    . . . . . . Pokémon +/-
    . . . . . . Pokémon-!!
    . . . . . . Pokémon-{XX}
    . . . . . . Pokémon juj
    . . . . . . Pokémon mod
    . . . . . . Pokémon o_0
    . . . . . . Pokémon-STORM
    . . Other Mechanics
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Mechanics
    . . . . . . Crystal Pokémon
    . . . . . . δ - Delta Species
    . . . . Actual (Illegal) TCG Mechanics
    . . . . . . Ancient Pokémon
    . . . . Other Mechanics (Pokegym-Used)
    . . . . . . DuoPokémon
    . . . . . . Poké-Tool
    . . . . Crossover Pokémon
    . . . . . . Sonic Related Pokémon
    . . . . . . . . Chao Pokémon
    . . . . . . . . Super Pokémon
    . . . . . . . . Hyper Pokémon
    . . . . . . FF7 Pokémon
    . . . . . . . . Chocobo Pokémon
    . . . . . . . . Summon Materia Pokémon

    Prefixes:

    Prefixes tag something onto the beginning of the Pokémon's name.

    Actual (Legal) TCG Prefixes

    Dark Pokémon - noun, coined by Nintendo (named after their Dark nature, referring to the Pokémon's state of being abused or corrupted)
    Type: In the past, they would have been Normal; now, they are usually Normal and (D) (just (D) if Colorless).
    Evolution: Evolves from Basic Pokémon or "Dark" equivalent of Stage 1. There has only been 1 Dark Basic Pokémon (Dark Celibi), so doing a Dark Basic Pokémon is generally unappreciated.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Dark
    HP: In the past, Stage 1 would be about +10 or 20 of Basic, and Stage 2 would be about +10 of Stage 1; now, they might have the same as a normal Pokémon would, or perhaps rounded down a little.
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Attacks are generally more bizzare, as opposed to doing direct damage, or it will do brute damage with little to no other effects (depending on type). Will usually have a disrupting Power or Body.
    Dark Pokémon Rule: None


    Light Pokémon - noun, coined by Nintendo (named after their Light nature, referring to the Pokémon's state of being kind or pure-hearted)
    Evolution: Evolves from Basic Pokémon or "Light" equivalent of Stage 1. There have been no Light Basic Pokémon, so doing a Light Basic Pokémon is generally unappreciated.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Light
    HP: Generally the same HP, or maybe 10 more (no more than 120, of course)
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Attacks are very weak for their cost, and will generally heal your Pokémon, avoid Special Conditions, or reduce damage done in some other way.
    Light Pokémon Rule: None


    Shining Pokémon - noun, coined by Nintendo (named after the fact that in the Game Boy game, Pokémon such as these shone a bright sparkle upon appearing) - These discolored Pokémon were very rare back in the Neo block of cards... since then, they have been superceded by Pokémon (*).
    Type: Normal
    Evolution: Always Basic Pokémon.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Shining
    HP: (forgot; will research)
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Attacks are generally more bizzare, and maybe even toned down a bit. They will use many different types of basic Energy in their attack costs.
    Shining Pokémon Rule: You can't have more then 1 Shining (name of Pokémon) in your deck.


    (other) Pokémon - Well... these are ones that don't have much to go on. There was only 1 of each of these descriptors: Cool Pokémon (Cool Porygon), Flying Pokémon (Flying Pikachu), and Surfing Pokémon (Surfing Pikachu). These, as such, are generally unheard of in fake cards. Still... you could tag it on if you wanted, and I wanted to make a small reference to them.

    Pokegym-Used Prefixes:

    Angel Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the word angel, referring to the Pokémon's state of being holy or pure) - (description from Angel Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. Angel Pokémon are more defensive than offensve, and have +20 HP more than usual. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Holy, represented by (T)
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Angel
    HP: Normal +20 HP
    Weakness: None
    Resistance: (D)
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Base damage of attack/s is weaker by 10-20 (i.e. 10 to 20 less damage than usual for attack cost)
    Angel Pokémon Rule: None


    Dream Pokémon - noun, coined by Mr_Fuji (unknown origin) - (description from Dream Scyther thread) 1 Prize card for KO. One card with specific name per deck (like Shining Pokémon from Wizards). See below for detailed description.
    Type: Normal
    Evolution: Any stage, evolves from previous stage with Dream in its name
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Dream
    HP: Normal -10 HP
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Low (1 or 2)
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Must involve inaccuracy (ex. Transparency, Smokescreen, Agility)
    Dream Pokémon Rule: You may only play one Dream [Name of Pokémon] per deck.


    Inferno Pokémon - noun, coined by Ancient Pokémon Trainer (named after the word inferno, referring to the an intense fire) - (description deciphered from the Inferno Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Dual Type (Normal type and (R) type), cannot originally be a (R) Pokémon. Examples: (G)(R), (P)(R), (W)(R)
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Inferno
    HP:
    Weakness: Normal Weakness and (W). Examples: (R)(W), (P)(W), (L)(R)
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: Normal +1
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: 1 attack cost must consist of at least 2 (R)
    Inferno Pokémon Rule: None


    Inverse Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the word inverse, referring to the inversion of normal type, I think) - (description from Inverse Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Whatever type the Pokémon would normally be weak to. Example: Charizard would be (W) type.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Inverse
    HP: Normal minus 20 to 30 HP
    Weakness: Weak to their normal type. Example: Kyogre would be weak to (W)
    Resistance: An Inverse Pokémon’s Resistance should be a type in the other "loop" of types (see below for type loops). Not just any type in the other loop, it must correspond by numbers (for example, in loop1, Fire is type 1. In loop2, Dark is type 1. So if the Pokémon's normal type is Fire, its inverse would be Resistant to Dark). If your Pokémon's normal type is Colorless, treat it as if its normal type is whatever its inverse type is (for Resistance only).
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Inverse Pokémon can have Poké-Powers or Poké-Bodies, unlike Reversal Pokémon. However, if they do, they cannot have more then 2 attacks. If they do not have a Poké-Power or Poké-Bod, they cannot have less than 2 attacks or more than 3 attacks. Now, onto the attacks. In exchange for the lower HP, Inverse Pokémon get slightly broken attacks, as if they were EXs, but with lower HP instead of higher, and no 2 prize rule. Each Inverse Pokémon must have one, no more, no less, Inverse Attack. What is an inverse attack? It must be an attack the Pokémon can learn in the GBA/GBC games, but it has to be the same type as the Pokémon(the real type, not the Inverse type). However, the Inverse attack must require energy of both the Pokémon's normal type AND it's Inverse type. For example, a Blaziken could be [W] type and have an attack that has an attack cost of [W] and [R], or be [P] type and require [P] and [F]. Inverse attacks must contain the Inverse Rule, see below. Their regular attacks can use their normal type's energy or their Inverse type's energy.
    Inverse Pokémon Type Loops: {Loop1: (R), (W), (G), (L)}, {Loop2; (D), (P), (F), (M)}
    Inverse Rule: If the Defending Pokémon is weak to [X], this attack's damage is doubled (after applying Weakness, Resistance, and any other effects on the Defending Pokémon). If the Defending Pokémon is weak to [Z], this attack's damage is halved (rounded up to the nearest 10) (after applying Weakness, Resistance, and any other effects on the Defending Pokémon).
    Editorial Note: In this extremely complicated rule (which is not a rule for the Pokémon, it is the rule for an inverse attack), (X) is the Inverse Pokémon's Inverse type loop match (so an Inverse Charizard's (X) would be (P)). (Z) is the Inverse Pokémon's Resistance (its normal type's loop match).
    Inverse Pokémon Rule: None


    Lucanian Pokémon - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after the products of Lucan Inc., a.k.a. Lucanian technology) - Lucanian Pokémon are cyborg-like doppelgangers of their normal counterparts. They are part robotic, hence their (M) type.
    Type: Dual Type (Normal type and (M) type), Examples: (G)(M), (P)(M), (W)(M)
    Evolution: Evolves from "Lucanian" Basic Pokémon or "Lucanian" equivalent of Stage 1.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Lucanian
    HP: Normal
    Weakness: Normal, sometimes substitutable for (R).
    Resistance: Normal, sometimes substitutable for (G).
    Retreat Cost: Normal +1
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: About average, allowed to use (M) in attack costs
    Lucanian Pokémon Rule: None


    Mystic Pokémon - noun, coined by PenguinMaster (named after the word mystic, referring to the mystic nature of the Pokémon involved) - (description gathered from the Mystic Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. Unfortunately, most of the details of this type of Pokémon were lost after the contest had ended. See below for detailed description.
    Type: (R), (L), (P), (G), (D), or (W)
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Mystic
    HP: Relatively Low, but Rule Unknown
    Weakness: Rule Unknown
    Resistance: Rule Unknown
    Retreat Cost: Rule Unknown
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Energy in the attack cost of its attack/s are limited to (R), (L), (P), (G), (D), (W), and (C). One attack must use 3 different types of the previously mentioned Energy (other than (C)). The attacks, Poké-Powers, and Poké-Bodies on a Mystic Pokémon did very little damage; instead, they had weird affects on the playing field and cards both in and out of play.
    Mystic Pokémon Rule: Each player may only have 1 Pokémon with Mystic in its name in play at a time. If a player puts another Mystic Pokémon in play, discard this card.


    Peace Pokémon - noun, coined by Ancient Pokémon Trainer (named after the word peace, referring to their generally defensive value and reduced damage) - (description deciphered from the Peace Pokémon contest)
    These Pokémon are special Pokémon and though you think that because they’re Peace Pokémon that they won't battle, you’re wrong! They will battle, they just hope that one day in the human world there will be peace. Now the symbol for the type will be (E). Since (P) is Psychic, I will use BT's method and go to the next letter. These Pokémon have a special Poké-Power called Peace Making. Here it is:
    Poké-Power: Peace Making
    If Peace [Name of Pokémon] is on your Bench and your Active Pokémon attacks, you may use this Poké-Power. If your attack does at least 10 damage to the Defending Pokémon, you may make that attack do 10 less damage. Then, remove 1 damage counter from each of your Pokémon.
    Top Stats: Must have Peace before its name. Peace Pokémon have +20HP than usual and are ONLY the (E) type. (No Dual-types.) Peace Pokémon have no Weakness, no Resistance, and regular Retreat Cost. It is slightly weaker than a Normal Pokémon and must include the Poké-Power. They cannot have another Poké-Power or Poké-Body. It must be a final stage. (Basics that don't evolve also OK.) Peace Pokémon do 10 less damage from usual. One of its attacks must require AT LEAST 2 (E) energy to use the attack.


    Quick Pokémon - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named for how quickly these Pokémon can be set up, attack, and retreat) - (description from Quick Pokémon Contest) When a Quick Pokémon is Knocked Out, your opponent flips a coin. If heads, he or she draws a Prize card. If tails, he or she does not a Prize card. Quick Pokémon are relatively weak Basic Pokémon that do not evolve, with no more than 50 HP. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Normal, or dual-type of normal and (Q). Examples: (R), (M), (L)(Q), (D)(Q)
    Evolution: Basic Pokémon, do not evolve into other Pokémon.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Quick
    HP: maximum of 50 HP
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: None
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Quick Pokémon have attacks that have a maximum attack cost of two, and usually will have either 1 Energy for 10 or 20 attacks, 2 Energy attacks for 20 to 30 damage, or relatively weak, flippy attacks with 2 or more coins that are usually 10x or 20x. Attacks that use (Q) Energy should have fixed damage with some simple PITB (Pain In The Bum) effect, like Smokescreen, or an attack with a base damage of 10x.
    Quick Pokémon Rule: You can't have more than 4 Pokémon in your deck with Quick in its name. When Quick Pokémon is Knocked Out, your opponent flips a coin. If heads, he or she draws a Prize card. If tails, he or she does not a Prize card. (Discard Quick Pokémon anyway.)
    "

    Rainbow Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the word rainbow, referring to its type and the need for Rainbow Energy for at least 1 of its attacks) - (description from Rainbow Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Introducing the Rainbow Type! Your Pokémon must be the Rainbow Type, which is represented by [X].
    Pokémon Choice: Has to have Rainbow before it's name. Evolves from the Pokémon it would normally evolve from (Rainbow Typhlosion evolves from Quilava, not Rainbow Quilava).
    HP/Stage: Normal.
    Weakness/Resistance/Retreat Cost: Normal Retreat Cost. No Weakness or Resistance, though.
    Abilities: Make it regular for the most part, but it must have at least 1 Rainbow Attack, which requires RAINBOW ENERGY (only rainbow and colorless, no fire for example)!!! This is represented as [X], once again. But yes, I am talking about the already made Rainbow and Double Rainbow Energy cards. A Rainbow attack must also have this text:
    If the Defending Pokémon is a [X] Pokémon, this attack's base damage is doubled.


    Reversal Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the word Reversal, referring to the reversal of Weakness and Resistance) - (description from Reversal Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Nothing special.
    HP/Stage: Regular HP. Just because they are special doesn't mean they don't keep their stage in the evolution line and their decent HP level. They do keep it.
    Pokémon Choice: Final stage of evolution, but non-evolvers are ok. And it's like evo-EXs, they evolve from regular Pokémon (A Reversal Meganium would evolve from Bayleef, not Reversal Bayleef)
    Weakness/Resistance/Retreat Cost: RC should be normal, but Weakness and Resistance will be different. Reversal Pokémon are resistant to what they would normally be weak to, and weak to what they would normally be strong against.
    Abilities: Reversal Pokémon cannot have Poke-Powers or Poke-Bodies. At least one of their attacks must follow the Reversal Format - The attack must be named after an attack they can learn in the GBA/GBC games. The attack may not be Colorless or the type of the Pokémon using it. It requires the proper energies (if a Rapidash used a Grass attack, it would require Grass energies, not Fire). However, it must always have the following text in it, [X] being the type that the attack would be in the GB games: If the Defending Pokémon's Weakness is [X], this attack's damage is doubled (after applying Weakness, Resistance, or any other effects on the Defending Pokémon).


    Sacrifice Pokémon - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after the need to sacrifice a number of the previous Stage cards to play it) - (description from Sacrifice Pokémon contest) Sacrifice Pokémon have +20 HP for each card sacrificed to put them into play, and may be anywhere in strength to a normal Pokémon to that of a weak EX Pokémon. They also have a Poké-Body that is required to play them. In the following, [X] is some number (minimum of 1, maximum of 3) and [Name of Pokémon] is that Pokémon's previous stage:
    Poké-Body: Sacrifice
    You must discard [X] Pokémon named [Name of Pokémon] from your hand in order to play this card.


    Shadow Pokémon - noun, 2 definitions
    definition 1: coined by Cooltrainer Aaron and PenguinMaster (named after the Shadow Pokémon of Pokémon Colosseum) - (description from Shadow Pokémon contest) Shadow Pokémon must follow these rules standard to all Shadow Pokémon. Therefore, these "Shadow Rules" don't get printed on the card, just consider them in the rulebook. OK, here are the Shadow Rules:
    1. Attack: Shadow Rush
    Damage: ?
    Attack Cost: 1 Energy of the same type as the Pokémon, 1 Colorless
    Special: Flip 3 coins. If there are 0 heads, this attack does nothing. If exactly one is heads, this attack does 20 damage and 10 damage to itself. If exactly 2 are heads, this attack does 50 damage and 20 damage to itself. If all 3 are heads, this attack does no damage this turn and this Pokémon activates the Poke-Power: Hypermode.
    2. Poké-Power: Hypermode
    This Pokémon can only use Shadow Rush. Instead of flipping 3 coins, flip 4. If there are 3 or 4 heads, Shadow Rush does 50 damage and 20 damage to itself. All other flip results are the same as the effects of the original attack. To deactivate this Poké-Power, the player must use the Call command and skip the attack that turn when this Pokémon is Active.
    3. Poké-Body: Purification Process
    Starting the turn this Pokémon is played on the field, all attacks other than Shadow Rush are locked until the specified number of turns an attack has on it has passed.
    4. A Shadow Pokémon cannot evolve until all its attacks are unlocked.
    5. Shadow Pokémon can evolve from or into any normally named Pokémon. No Pokémon with Dark, Light, or Trainer Names.
    6. Other than Hypermode and Purification Process, a Shadow Pokémon can't use other Pokémon Powers.
    7. A Shadow Pokémon can have up to 3 attacks other than Shadow Rush.

    definition 2: coined by Fangking and ColdFire (unknown origin) - (description from what I can remember) They are identified by a purple moon as a symbol after their name and they are always Basic Pokémon, much like the Pokémon-* and their star. Shadow Pokémon Rule: When Shadow Pokémon is Knocked Out, flip 2 coins. For each heads, your opponent draws a Prize card.

    Spectrum Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the work spectrum, referring to the colors of the rainbow) - (description from Spectrum Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. Spectrum Pokémon require multiple different types of Energy cards for their attacks. See below for detailed description.
    Type: (X), the Rainbow type.
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Spectrum
    HP: Normal plus either 10 or 20.
    Weakness: None
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Throughout all of its attacks (it can have a max of 4 attacks), it must use at least 1 of every kind of basic Energy, including Colorless.
    Spectrum Pokémon Rule: None


    Über Pokémon - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after how über, or great, these Pokémon are) - (description from Über Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO. An Über Pokémon is a very strong Pokémon, but is the only one that can be in that deck. See below for detailed description.
    Type: Normal, rarely dual-type.
    Evolution: Any Stage, but is a Basic Pokémon. Examples: Porygon, Torchic, Starmie
    Prefix/Suffix: Prefix of Trainer’s name and Über. Examples: LorakLucan’s Über Porygon, Burninating_Torchic’s Über Torchic, Misty’s Über Starmie
    HP: Exactly 350 HP.
    Weakness: None
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: None (N/A due to rule)
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Bulky and hard to use, but strong once set up. Attack strengths stronger than normal, but weaker than Pokémon-ex.
    Über Pokémon Rule: You can’t have more than 1 Über Pokémon in your deck. If you have any Über Pokémon in your deck, you can’t have any other Basic Pokémon or Evolution cards in your deck.


    ~-o-~

    Suffixes:

    Suffixes tag something onto the end of the Pokémon's name.

    Actual (Legal) TCG Suffixes

    Pokémon (*)

    Pokegym-Used Suffixes

    Double-Type Pokémon - noun, coined by Burninating_Torchic (named after the status of having 2 types (or colors)) - (description from Double-Type Pokémon contest) 1 Prize card for KO, a.k.a. Pokémon-2. See below for detailed description.
    Type: (X2), where X is any type (as opposed to the Rainbow type). Examples: (R2), (W2), (M2)
    Evolution: Evolves normally, must be final evolution.
    Prefix/Suffix: Suffix of -2. Examples: Typhlosion-2, Porygon2-2
    HP: Normal
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: no more then 3 of any combination of powers/bodies/attacks. No more then one Poké-Power or Poké-Body. Can't have both a Poké-Power and a Poké-Body. Duh. The ONLY type of energy that may be used in attacks is the X from our earlier example (referring to the type that is doubled).
    Double-Type Pokémon Rule: When [X2] type Pokémon attacks a Pokémon weak to [X], that attack does quadruple damage instead of double. When a Pokémon [X2] type Pokémon is weak to attack [X2] type Pokémon, that attack does quadruple damage instead of double.


    Pokémon +/- - noun, 2 definitions

    definition 1: coined by LorakLucan (named after plus and minus, a balance of Yin and Yang) - (description from upcoming contest) Pokémon +/- are now (T)(D) type, evolve from normal counterparts, have the same Weaknesses, Resistances, and Retreat Costs as their normal form. They also have a Pokémon +/- rule, always have a number of HP divisible by 20, and have 3 attacks: one that uses (T) Energy (and anything else if wanted except (D) Energy), one that uses (D) Energy (and anything else if wanted except (T) Energy), and one of the following: an attack that uses neither (T) or (D) Energy, a Poké-Power, a Poké-Body, or a Poké-Tool. They are allowed one “broken” attack, so long as the broken part of it is not excessive damage. The following is the Pokémon +/- rule:
    Pokémon +/- Rule: Prevent all effects of attacks, including damage, to Pokémon +/- by Pokémon-!!. If there are a number of Pokémon +/- in play equal to the number of Pokémon-!! in play, prevent all effects of attacks, including damage, done by Pokémon-!!.

    definition 2: (archaic) coined by LorakLucan (named after plus and minus, a balance of Yin and Yang) - (description from LLC: Dawns and Dusks {Expansion the First}) Pokémon +/- are always (C)(D) type, evolve from normal counterparts, have the same Weaknesses, Resistances, and Retreat Costs as their normal form. They also have a Pokémon +/- rule, always have a number of HP divisible by 20, and have 3 attacks: one that uses (C) Energy (and anything else if wanted except (D) Energy), one that uses (D) Energy (and anything else if wanted except (C) Energy), and one of the following: an attack that uses neither (C) nor (D) Energy, a Poké-Power, a Poké-Body, or a Poké-Tool. They are allowed one “broken” attack, so long as the broken part of it is not excessive damage. The following is the Pokémon +/- rule:
    Pokémon +/- Rule: Prevent all effects of attacks, including damage, to Pokémon +/- by Pokémon-!!. If there are a number of Pokémon +/- in play equal to the number of Pokémon-!! in play, prevent all effects of attacks, including damage, done by Pokémon-!!

    Pokémon-{XX} - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named representing a dual-type same type Pokémon) - (description from LLC: Rise of Twilight) Pokémon-{XX} are dual type, but of the same type (i.e. (P)(P) type is a Pokémon-{PP}). These Pokémon are slightly stronger than normal (10 HP more, at most), are double of the same type, can only be a Pokémon that, in the GB game, has only one type (example: Magmar {RR} = okay, Charizard {RR} = not), and have 2 of the same type of Weakness and Resistance (i.e. A Pokémon-{LL} can be weak to (F)(F) and resistant to (M)(M), but both types of Weakness or Resistance must be of the same type).

    Pokémon juj - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after a misspelling of judge, from the Pokémon judging the match) - (description from Pokémon-juj contest) Pokémon juj is actually a Trainer card used by neither player, is not allowed in a deck, and presides over a match until a Stadium card comes into play. They tend to have affects on the field for both players that may be beneficial or harmful. See below for detailed description.
    Type: (C)
    Evolution: Any Stage, but is a Basic Pokémon. Examples: Porygon, Torchic, Starmie
    Prefix/Suffix: Suffix of juj
    HP: 200 HP
    Weakness: None
    Resistance: None
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: 1 Poké-Body, has Stadium in name, affects both players
    Pokémon-juj Rule: Pokémon-juj stays in play until a Stadium Card comes into play. Treat Pokémon-juj as if it were (C) type. While in play, Pokémon-juj can be attacked by any player, has no attacks of its own, can’t retreat and can’t be affected by a Special Condition. If Pokémon-juj is Knocked Out or a Stadium card comes into play, put that card face down and treat it as if it were no longer in play.
    Example of Pokémon-juj (in proper format):

    Cradily juj (200 HP)
    Trainer card, Pokémon-juj

    [Rule: Pokémon juj
    Pokémon-juj stays in play until a Stadium Card comes into play. Treat Pokémon-juj as if it were (C) type. While in play, Pokémon-juj can be attacked by any player, has no attacks of its own, can’t retreat and can’t be affected by a Special Condition. If Pokémon-juj is Knocked Out or a Stadium card comes into play, put that card face down and treat it as if it were no longer in play.]

    Poké-Body: Suction Cup Stadium
    As long as Cradily juj is in play, each player’s Active Pokémon can’t retreat.


    Pokémon mod - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after a modification to force Pokémon to slow down and evolve normally) - (description from Pokémon mod contest) Pokémon mod are less broken than Pokémon ex, stronger than usual Pokémon, and only 1 Prize for a Knock Out. But, there's a catch: Pokémon mod can only be played after a certain number of turns. Pokémon mod gain +10 HP for each turn after the turn they normally would be played. Pokémon mod also have a lower Retreat Cost than normal by about (C) to (C)(C). The following Poké-Power is used to put the Pokémon mod into play:
    Poké-Power: Pokémon Mod (Some Roman Numeral)
    [Name of Pokémon] mod can't be played until the beginning of your [number same as Roman numeral in Arabic numbers] turn. If the effects of an attack, Trainer, Poké-Power or Poké-Body would cause [Name of Pokémon] mod to be evolved from [its previous evolution] before the beginning of your [same number] turn, discard [Name of Pokémon] mod.


    Pokémon o_0 - noun, coined by LorakLucan (named after an emoticon to show the state of being weirded out) - (description from LI: o_0) Pokémon o_0 are weird, silly Pokémon, comparable to Imakuni's Pokémon, that either involve strange actions, are absurdly broken, like "Each Pokémon in play is now Knocked Out (both yours and your opponent’s)", or just make no sense whatsoever. The following is the Pokémon o_0 rule:
    Pokémon o_0 is not legal for Organized Play.

    Pokémon-STORM - noun, coined by ZoraJolteon (on cards, the word STORM is replaced by a webding in the shape of a stormcloud, although that font is not supported on this forum.) - Pokémon-STORM count as neither Basic Pokémon nor Evolution cards when out of play, but can be played as either. Pokémon-STORM can evolve from any card with their previous stage in it's name. For example, Jasmine's Steelix STORM can evolve from Brock's Onix ex if you wanted to. This is because Pokémon-STORM originally belonged to Teams Aqua and Magma, who were not opposed to snatching Pokémon from their previous owners if it meant getting their way. If a Pokémon-STORM is played as an evolved Pokémon, it's maximum HP is increased by 30.
    Type: Their normal type. Dual types are permitted.
    Evolution: May be played as either a Basic Pokémon, or as an Evolution card that evolves from any Pokémon with this Pokémon's previous stage in its name.
    Prefix/Suffix: Suffix of a Stormcloud symbol. An Example.
    HP: Generally 30 less that what they would normally have, often slightly lower.
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: No more then 3 of any combination of powers/bodies/attacks. No more then one Poké-Power or Poké-Body. Can't have both a Poké-Power and a Poké-Body. Uses whatever Energy types this Pokemon might if it was normal. Exploud is allowed 4.
    Pokémon-STORM Rule: "X-STORM may be played as either a Basic Pokémon, or as an Evolution card that evolves from any Pokémon with Y in it's name. Evolved Pokémon-STORM get +30HP"


    ~-o-~

    Other Mechanics:

    The other mechanics don't tag anything onto the Pokémon's name, so it is still limited by other Pokémon despite the other mechanic. Still, some are noteworthy, and end up here.

    Actual (Legal) TCG Mechanics

    Crystal - Crystal Pokémon are similar to exSS Kecleon in the sense that Energy attached to them will affect their type. At the beginning of your turn, it is (C) type. It has a Poké-Body that is phrased such that attaching 1 of three basic Energy cards will change its type to the type of that Energy card until te end of your turn. One Energy type will most likely be its usual type (if its usual type is a Classic type), and the other two can vary. More information soon.

    δ - Delta Species - Classification of these enigmatic Pokémon is difficult at this time; more information as it arrives.

    Actual (Illegal) TCG Mechanics

    These mechanics are illegal for the reason that there is no English equivalent of these Pokémon.

    Ancient Pokémon - noun, coined by Nintendo (named after the fact that the Mew was from an Ancient fossil?) - Well... not much to go on. There was only 1 Ancient Pokémon (Mew, or "Ancient Mew"), and as such is generally unheard of in fake cards. It text was in hieroglyphs, and had to be translated. The reason this was illegal is that it had no English equivalent card. The rubric below is purely speculation.
    Type: Normal
    Evolution: Unknown (pure speculation), but probably normal.
    Prefix/Suffix: None
    HP: Low (?)
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Stronger than usual by 10 (?)
    Ancient Pokémon Rule: None.


    Pokegym-Used TCG Mechanics

    DuoPokémon - noun, coined by BurninatingTorchic (named after the fact that there are two Pokémon are available) - There are two Pokémon on this card, but it can only be played one way or the other... your choice! A DuoPokemon is capable of evolving: because a DuoSpearowRattata played as Rattata would be treated for all intensive purposes as Rattata, then it could evolve into a card that "Evolves from Rattata". DuoPokémon can be Evolution cards: an example would be DuoPoliwhirlFearow. Note that it can be any two of the same stage of evolution, not necesarily the same as the previous DuoPokemon's species. The two Pokémon do not have to have the same type or color.
    Type: Normal
    Evolution: Evolves from/into the card it is played as
    Prefix/Suffix: None
    HP: Normal to 10 HP less than normal
    Weakness: Normal
    Resistance: Normal
    Retreat Cost: Normal
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Attacks are a little less broken than usual.
    DuoPokémon Rule: None.


    Poké-Tool - Information soon.



    ~-o-~
    Crossover Pokémon

    When other games combine with the Pokémon TCG... Technically, many of these fit into Prefixes, Suffixes, and Owners, but it is easier having them consolidated into one section, so here they are.

    Sonic Related Pokémon

    Chao Pokémon - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Chao creatures from the Sonic Adventure series) - (description from Sonic Adventure 2 Battle (Set 1)) Chao is a Trainer card, shown below.

    Chao
    30 HP
    Trainer Card

    Play Chao as you would a Baby Pokémon. While in play, Chao counts as a Pokémon instead of a Trainer card. Chao has no attacks, Baby Rule, Weakness, or Resistance; cannot retreat; and cannot be affected by a Special Condition. If Chao is Knocked Out, it doesn't count as a Knocked Out Pokémon. (Discard it anyway.) At any time during your turn (before your attack), you may discard Chao from play.

    Poké-Power: Chao Evolution
    Chao can evolve into any Basic Pokémon with Sonic, Tails, Knuckles, Shadow, Eggman, red face paint, or Chao in its name.


    Other Chao cards that evolve from this card are Basic Pokémon and must have the following Poké-Power:

    Poké-Power: Spun Incorrectly
    If [name of Pokémon, usually a trainer's name or alignment followed by the word Chao] did not evolve from Chao when you put it into play, return [name of Pokémon, usually a trainer's name or alignment followed by the word Chao] to your hand.

    This is a special Poké-POWER that doesn't get turned off until the card is successfully played. If the card can't be successfully played, the power will return the card to the hand before the turn-off effect occurs.

    Cards that have Chao in its name and directly evolves from the Chao Trainer card always have 50 HP and a Retreat Cost of 1 {C}. If the first word of the name is that of a Pokémon (i.e. Pikachu, Mewtwo, Zigzagoon, etc.), then that card has normal Weakness and Resistance, up to 1 of the former and up to 2 of the latter. If the first word of the mane is not that of a Pokémon (i.e. Magma, Ocean, Sonic, etc.), then that card has no Weakness and no Resistance.

    Additionally, for a Pokémon name to qualify for the Pokémon Chao mechanic, it must be a Basic Pokémon with no Baby Pokémon form. Simply put, that means Pikachu qualifies, but Pichu does not.

    Super [Sonic or Shadow]'s Pokémon - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the super-form that a character can take after finding all 7 Chaos Emeralds) - These powerful cards evolve from that trainer's previous stage Pokémon and have the following rule:

    To play this card, you need to have played at least 1 Trainer card exactly named Chaos Emerald during the course of this game.

    There is a rule on the Chaos Emerald trainer card that allows up to 7 copies to be put into a deck.

    These Pokémon have a slight HP boost and a slight attack boost. For single-Prize cards, HP caps for this kind of Pokémon is 120 except in the case of Wailord and Blissey, in which case the cap is 140. For multi-Prize cards, normal HP caps apply except in the case of Wailord and Blissey, in which case the cap is the normal cap plus 20 more.

    Hyper [Sonic or Shadow]'s Pokémon - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the hyper-form taken by Sonic after obtaining all 7 Super Emeralds in Sonic 3 and Knuckles) - These super-powerful cards, more powerful than that trainer's Super Pokémon, evolve from that trainer's previous stage Pokémon and have the following rule:

    To play this card, between both players, a total of at least 7 Trainer cards exactly named Chaos Emerald must have been played during the course of the game.

    These Pokémon have up to 125% of normal HP and up to 125% of normal attack power. For single-Prize cards, HP cap is 150. For multi-Prize cards, the HP cap for one of these Pokémon is 30 more than the normal HP cap.

    These Pokémon also have a higher Retreat Cost cap. The cap is 2 {C} more than the normal cap for the number of Prizes. For example, a single-Prize card, the cap is 6 {C}.

    ~-o-~

    FF7 Related Pokémon

    Chocobo Pokémon - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Chocobo creatures from the Final Fantasy series) - These cards, unless an effect states otherwise, can only be played alongside this Trainer card:

    Chocobo Egg
    Trainer Card

    You must play this card to play a Basic Pokémon with Chocobo in its name. Draw a card.

    All Chocobo cards have this Poké-POWER:

    Poké-POWER Incorrectly Hatched
    If you didn't play a Trainer card named Chocobo Egg when <name> Chocobo is put into play, unless an effect ignores this power, return <name>Chocobo to your hand.

    In the power, <name> is the name of the Pokémon or other word that preceeds Chocobo in the card name.

    Aside from the playing requirement and Poké-POWER, Chocobo and Chao cards play the same way, right down to always returning to the hand if the requirement is not met.

    Summon Materia Pokémon - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Summon Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - Summon Materia cards have Summon Materia in its name, followed by a colon :)) and the name of the summon. All Summon Materia have 80 HP, 1 {C} Retreat, as well as types, Weakness, and Resistance that fit the Summon (i.e. Shiva's an Ice summon, hence its {R} Weakness). Summon Materia have attacks that match their actual abilities and costs that match their power (Knights of Round's attack cost is a whopping 10 Energy with a minimum 4 discard since it's very powerful). These cards are restricted to 4 Summon Materia per deck.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2006
  3. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 3: Owners (Trainers and Teams)

    Index:
    . . Singular Trainers:
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Singular Trainers
    . . . . . . (RBY) Gym Leaders
    . . . . . . . . Brock
    . . . . . . . . Misty
    . . . . . . . . Lt. Surge
    . . . . . . . . Erika
    . . . . . . . . Sabrina
    . . . . . . . . Koga
    . . . . . . . . Blaine
    . . . . . . . . Giovanni
    . . . . . . Rocket
    . . . . Actual (Illegal) TCG Singular Trainers
    . . . . . . Imakuni? - Japanese Promos
    . . . . . . TV Show Trainers
    . . . . . . . . Ash
    . . . . . . . . May
    . . . . . . (GSC) Gym Leaders - Pokémon *Vs
    . . . . . . . . Falkner
    . . . . . . . . Bugsy
    . . . . . . . . Whitney
    . . . . . . . . Morty
    . . . . . . . . Jasmine
    . . . . . . . . Chuck
    . . . . . . . . Pryce
    . . . . . . . . Clair
    . . . . . . . . Janine
    . . . . . . . . Will
    . . . . . . (GSC) Elite 4 - Pokémon *Vs
    . . . . . . . . Will
    . . . . . . . . Bruno
    . . . . . . . . Karen
    . . . . . . . . Lance
    . . . . . . Alto Mare Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 5)
    . . . . . . . . "Alto Mare"
    . . . . . . . . Ross
    . . . . . . . . Annie
    . . . . . . Jirachi Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 6)
    . . . . . . . . Fyuunsu
    . . . . . . . . Butler
    . . . . . . Deoxys Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 7)
    . . . . . . . . "Space Fissure"
    . . . . . . . . "Sky"
    . . . . . . . . "LaRousse"
    . . . . . . . . Audrey
    . . . . . . . . Catherine
    . . . . . . . . Shota
    . . . . . . . . Hitomi
    . . . . . . . . Ryu
    . . . . . . Mew Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 8)
    . . . . . . . . "Hadou"
    . . . . . . . . Roota
    . . . . . . . . Eileen
    . . . . . . . . Aaron
    . . . . . . . . Kid

    . . . . Pokegym-Used Trainers
    . . . . . . (Hoenn) Gym Leaders
    . . . . . . Frontier Brains
    . . Teams:
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Teams
    . . . . . . Team Magma
    . . . . . . Team Aqua
    . . . . . . "Team Rocket"
    . . . . Actual (Illegal) TCG Teams
    . . . . . .
    . . . . Pokegym-Used Teams
    . . . . . . Team Plasma
    . . . . . . Team Flora
    . . . . . . Team Cipher
    . . . . . . Team Snagem
    . . . . . . "Twilight Squad"

    . . Other Things / Locations:
    . . . . Actual (Legal) TCG Things / Locations
    . . . . . . Holon
    . . . . Pokegym-used TCG Things / Locations
    . . . . . . Epsilon

    Actual (Legal) TCG Singular Trainers

    These Trainers have appeared in the names of legal cards in America.

    Kanto Gym Leaders

    Brock - coined by NOA - Pewter City Gym Leader. Specializes in Rock-type Pokémon. Brock's Rock-types are typically {F} type in the TCG. Non-Rock types have their types like normal.

    Misty - coined by NOA - Cerulean City Gym Leader. Specializes in Water-type Pokémon. Misty's Water-types are typically {W} type in the TCG. Non-Water types have their types like normal.

    Lt. Surge - coined by NOA - Vermillion City Gym Leader. Specializes in Electric-type Pokémon. Lt. Surge's Electric-types are typically {L} type in the TCG. Non-Electric types have their types like normal.

    Erika - coined by NOA - Celadon City Gym Leader. Specializes in Grass-type Pokémon. Erika's Grass-types are typically {G} type in the TCG. Non-Grass types have their types like normal.

    Koga - coined by NOA - Fuschia City Gym Leader. Specializes in Poison-type Pokémon. Koga's Poison-types are typically {G} type in the TCG. Non-Poison types have their types like normal. (Later, he became a member of the Elite 4 in GSC, and appeared as such in the Pokémon *Vs set.)

    Sabrina - coined by NOA - Saffron City Gym Leader. Specializes in Psychic-type Pokémon. Sabrina's Psychic-types are typically {P} type in the TCG. Non-Psychic types have their types like normal.

    Blaine - coined by NOA - Cinnabar Island Gym Leader. Specializes in Fire-type Pokémon. Blaine's Fire-types are typically {R} type in the TCG. Non-Fire types have their types like normal.

    Giovanni - coined by NOA - Viridian City Gym Leader and boss of Team Rocket. As gym leader, specializes in Ground-type Pokémon. Giovanni's Ground-types are typically {F} type in the TCG. Non-Ground types have their types like normal.

    "Team Rocket" - coined by NOA - The reason for the quotes is this: Team Rocket only has one Pokémon: Team Rocket's Meowth, which has been reprinted in a slightly different form as "Rocket's Meowth". For all intensive purposes, please use "Rocket's" instead of "Team Rocket's" when referring to Pokémon that are owned by them but aren't Dark Pokémon. (I'm not quite sure what category "Rocket's" now fits into, but I would guess it to be a Trainer's Pokémon, despite it being a team in the GB game.)

    Actual (Illegal) TCG Singular Trainers

    These Trainers have appeared in the names of cards in places other than America, but have no English equivalent, and as such are not legal for tournament play..

    Deoxys Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 7)

    "Space Fissure" - The technical owner of the 3 Deoxys from the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    "Sky" - The technical owner of Rayquaza from the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    "LaRousse" - The technologically advanced city featured in Pokémon 7. In the Half-Deck, it is the technical owner of Plusle, Minun, and Munchlax.

    Audrey - Apparently, Audrey has a Masquerain in the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    Catherine - Apparently, Catherine has a Surskit in the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    Shota - The Blastoise trainer who came to LaRousse to battle, featured in the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    Hitomi - The Metagross trainer who came to LaRousse to battle, featured in the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    Ryu - The Blaziken trainer who came to LaRousse to battle, featured in the Pokémon 7 Half-Deck.

    Mew Half-Deck Trainers (Pokémon 8)

    "Hadou" - The technical owner of the Rukario from the Pokémon 8 Half-Deck. Hadou is the name of the "Wave Energy" from the movie. Apparently, Rukario belongs to this energy, which is somehow its trainer in the Pokémon 8 Half-Deck.

    Roota - Roota is the owner of a Mew. Honestly, I have no idea who this Roota is.

    Eileen - She seems to be some sort of queen in Pokémon 8, who has a maid by the name of Jenny. She also has a Manene, the pre-evolution of Mr. Mime.

    Aaron - Aaron is a part of some sort of army in Pokémon 8. He ends up in a crystal at the end of the movie, and is freed by Ash, somehow using a Time Flower, whatever that is... He has a Pidgeot in the Pokémon 8 Half-Deck.

    Kid - Kid is a girl. She was wearing a helmet in Pokémon 8. She is the trainer of 2 Manyula (the evolution of Sneasel) in the Pokémon 8 Half-Deck.


    Other Things / Locations
    Just... the other category.

    Actual (Legal) TCG Things / Locations
    Holon - The location where Delta Species Pokémon are forming. Holon's Pokémon can typically be attached to other Pokémon as Energy cards as well as being playable as Pokémon.

    Pokegym-used TCG Things / Locations
    Epsilon - (coined by MegaVelocibot, named after the Greek letter "epsilon" that follows "delta" in the Greek alphabet) Named also after Lorak Lucan's homeworld of Epsilon III. Epsilon's Pokémon can typically be be played as variuos types of Trainer cards as well as being playable as Pokémon.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2006
  4. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 4: Special Counters

    Some special counters are repeated, some are not. This is a list of commonly repeated counters.

    Special Counters - noun, coined by Sunflorazumarill (a collective term for certain named counters) - "Special counters" are collectively known as counters that aren't damage counters and aren't associated with certain Special Conditions. Along with many Pokégym-created special counters, special counters also include counters such as Char and Coloring from the Neo block.

    Actual (Legal) TCG Counters

    Char Counter - Effects were similar to the Burn condition, except it could not be removed by Retreating (not sure about evolution though... can someone comment on the comments thread and fill me in? I think it couldn't be removed by Evolution...).

    Coloring Counter - Used on a Smeargle promo to change the type of the Defending Pokémon

    Lightning Rod Counter - Used on an Electabuzz promo for the simple reason of painting a target on the Pokémon for its second attack.

    Pokegym-Used Counters

    Drowning Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after someone who can't hold their breath underwater) - A Drowning counter is a mark that a place, namely the field, has been flooded by an effect, such as a Poké-POWER or Stadium card. Drowning counters cannot be placed on {W} Pokémon as well as others determined by the effect that placed the Drowning counters as well as other effects that could prevent their placement. Only 1 Drowning counter can be on a Pokémon at a time. If an effect that would keep a Drowning counter from being placed on a Pokémon that already has a Drowning counter on it (such as evolving Eevee to Vaporeon), the Drowning counter is removed. If a Drowning counter is still in play three turns after it's placed, the Pokémon is Knocked Out. However, no Prizes are taken since taking Prizes in this fashion is considered more cheap than not taking Prizes in this fashion. I mean, what would you rather do, lose by having all of them drown or lose by having your opponent take all the Prizes against your survivors?

    Freeze Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the effect caused by being exposed to cold temperatures for an amount of time) - A Freeze counter is a powerful counter. A Pokémon that has a Freeze counter on it cannot attack or retreat as long as the Pokémon that placed it remains Active. Only 1 Freeze counter can be on a Pokémon at a time. The counter lost some of its power in the Final Fantasy VII set, where the mechanic was erratta'd where effects that allow all Special Conditions to be removed also remove a Freeze counter. The mechanic is mainly seen on {W} Pokémon, usually those that are Ice-type in the GBA game.

    Stone Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the material of most statues) - A Stone counter was a counter too powerful to remain viable. The mechanic was discontinued in the same set where it was introduced. A Pokémon with a Stone counter couldn't attack or retreat as long as the Pokémon with the counter on it remained in play.
    Only 1 Stone counter could be on a Pokémon at a time. All mechanics that remove Freeze counters as well as mechanics that remove Special Conditions remove this counter, but it was still deemed too broken to remain viable. The mechanic was intended to be mainly seen on {F} Pokémon, usually those that are Rock-type in the GBA game.

    Fear Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after a simpler term for a phobia) - Fear counters halve any damage the Pokémon with the counter does, rounded down, before Weakness and Resistance. Only 1 of any combination of Fear, Mini, and Frog counters can be on a Pokémon at a time. If a Mini or Frog counter is placed on a Pokémon with a Fear counter on it, the Fear counter is removed. The counter became easier to counter in the FF7 set, which made it so that Fear counters are removed by effects that remove all Special Conditions. The mechanic is mainly seen on {P} or {D} Pokémon, mainly those that are Ghost- or Dark-type in the GBA game.

    Shadow Counter - 1: (newer version) noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Shadow Pokémon from Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness) - Shadow counters are the signature mechanic of the evil teams of the Orre region, Cipher and Snagem. Pokémon with Shadow counters on it cannot evolve, leave play, or use the same attack twice in a row. Multiple Shadow counters can be on the same Pokémon. The mechanic was abusable in Colosseum-based sets, where a Pokémon could be made to never be free from Shadow counters, so the first XD-based set tweaked the mechanic to prevent placing Shadow counters on Pokémon that already have Shadow counters on them. At the end of the turn of the person whose Pokémon has the Shadow counters on it, 1 Shadow counter is removed from each Pokémon that has any Shadow counters on it. The mechanic is seen on Pokémon affiliated with evil people or enemy organizations from the Orre region.
    2: (older version) (temporarily unavailable)

    Mini Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after something of very small size) - A Mini counter is basically a more powerful Fear counter. It has all the mechanics of a Fear counter, plus more. A Pokémon with a Mini counter takes twice as much damage from an attack before Weakness and Resistance. Only 1 of any combination of Fear, Mini, and Frog counters can be on a Pokémon at a time. If a Fear or Frog counter is placed on a Pokémon with a Mini counter on it, the Mini counter is removed. Mini counters are removed by effects that remove all Special Conditions. The mechanic is mainly seen on {P} Pokémon, mainly those that are Psychic-type in the GBA game.

    Frog Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the amphibian) - A Frog counter is basically a more powerful Mini counter. In addition to taking twice the damage by an attack, a Pokémon with a Frog counter can't retreat or use any of its own attacks, but can attack with an unnamed attack that costs 1 {C} and does 10 damage. Only 1 of any combination of Fear, Mini, and Frog counters can be on a Pokémon at a time. If a Fear or Mini counter is placed on a Pokémon with a Frog counter on it, the Frog counter is removed. Frog counters are removed by effects that remove all Special Conditions. The mechanic is mainly seen on {W} Pokémon, mainly those that are Water-type in the GBA game.

    Haste Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the condition that increases speed in the Final Fantasy series) - Not all special counters have negative effects. You want to have a Haste counter on your Pokémon (unless, for some reason, you're playing a deck that has no Pokémon that has higher than 0 {C} Retreat Cost and doesn't expect to face Dark Muk or similar mechanics). A Haste counter reduces the Retreat Cost of the Pokémon that has it by 1 {C}. A Pokémon can only have 1 Haste counter on it at a time. It's not removed by effects that remove Special Conditions.

    Slow Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after a condition of lower speed) - Slow counters are basically the exact opposite of Haste counters. A Slow counter increases the Retreat Cost of the Pokémon that has it by 1 {C}. A Pokémon can only have 1 Slow counter on it at a time. It's not removed by effects that remove Special Conditions.

    Stop Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the condition of not moving) - Stop counters is the most powerful anti-Retreat mechanic you can find. A Stop counter prevents the Pokémon that has it from retreating. A Pokémon can only have 1 Stop counter on it at a time. It's not removed by effects that remove Special Conditions.

    Morph Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the action of changing shape) - Morph counters are a special kind of counter. A Morph counter does nothing as long as the Pokémon that has it has more than 0 Remaining HP. However, when that Pokémon is Knocked Out, in addition to taking the requisite Prizes, the player who placed the Morph counter draws 2 cards. It's not removed by effects that remove Special Conditions.

    Underwater Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the general place that fish live) - An Underwater counter cannot be placed on a {W} Pokémon. It makes sense, though, since an Underwater counter is an effect that prevents a Drowning counter from being placed on a Pokémon. It's not removed by effects that remove Special Conditions.

    HP Plus Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Independent Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - An HP Plus counter increases the maximum HP of the Pokémon the HP Plus counter is on by 20 for each HP Plus counter on the Pokémon. There is no limit to the number of HP Plus counters a Pokémon can have.

    Magic Plus Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Independent Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - A Magic Plus counter increases the damage done by an attack the Pokémon the Magic Plus counter is on. The damage increase is 10 per Magic Plus for each Energy card attached to the Pokémon but not used to pay for the attack's Energy cost. You can't add more than 20 damage per Magic Plus counter for the same attack. There is no limit to the number of Magic Plus counters a Pokémon can have.

    MP Plus Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Independent Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - A MP Plus counter reduces the Energy cost of an attack done by the Pokémon the MP Plus counter is on. The Energy cost reduction is 1 Energy per MP Plus counter. Simply put, if you had 2 MP Plus counters on a Pokémon, you can use an attack that uses 3 Energy with just 1 Energy attached. There is no limit to the number of MP Plus counters a Pokémon can have.

    Pre-Emptive Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Independent Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - A Pre-Emptive counter is placed on the field. At the start of the turn of the player who placed the Pre-Emptive counter, before that player draws a card, that player flips a coin. If heads, that player can use any of their Active Pokémon's attacks before their turn begins, then go on with their turn as normal. The attack used by the effect of the Pre-Emptive counter must be able to be used normally. A player can only have 1 Pre-Emptive counter on the field at a time.

    Cover Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the condition of being well-hidden) - A Cover counter cannot be placed in any game other than a 2-on-2 game, and only an Active Pokémon can have a Cover counter placed on it. Damage that would normally be done to the Active Pokémon without a Cover counter on it is instead done to the Pokémon with the Cover counter on it. A Pokémon can only have 1 Cover counter on it at a time.

    Regen Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the spell of the same name from Final Fantasy VII) - A Regen counter works after each player's turn. At the end of a player's turn, every Pokémon with a Regen counter on it has 2 damage counters removed from it. If a Pokémon with a Regen counter on it has less than 2 damage counters on it, all damage counters are removed from that Pokémon. A Pokémon can only have 1 Regen counter on it at a time.

    Berserk Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the condition of uncontrollably doing actions) - A Berserk counter is a counter that, when the Pokémon with a Berserk counter on it attacks, the other player flips a coin. If the flip is heads, the player who flipped the coin is the player who chooses that Pokémon's attack, rather than the player whose Pokémon has the Berserk counter. This counter is removed by effects that remove all Special Conditions. A Pokémon can only have 1 Berserk counter on it at a time.

    Greens Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the plants fed to Chocobo in Final Fantasy VII) - A Greens counter enhances a Chocobo's attributes. You can only place a Greens counter on a card that has Chocobo in its name that doesn't already have a Greens counter on it. Total HP of the Pokémon with a Greens counter on it is increased by 10 for each Greens counter on it, and attack power for damaging attacks is increased by 10 for every 2 Greens counters on it, rounded up to the nearest 10 damage. More than 1 Greens counter can be on a card at a time.

    Death Sentence Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the harshest possible punishment in the justice system) - Death Sentence counters are basically a set of countdown counters. When there are Death Sentence counters on a Pokémon, at the end of the opposing player's turn, 1 Death Sentence counter is removed from all Pokémon in play with a Death Sentence counter on it. When the last Death Sentence counter is removed, unless an effect on that Pokémon would prevent it from being Knocked Out, that Pokémon is Knocked Out.

    Sun Counter - noun, coined by NOA & Carrington388 (named after the star that Earth orbits around) - A Sun counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Sunny form, complete with a {R} type and {W} Weakness. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Rain Counter - noun, coined by NOA & Carrington388 (named after the water falling from clouds) - A Rain counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Rainy form, complete with a {W} type and {L} Weakness. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Hail Counter - noun, coined by NOA & Carrington388 (named after the ice falling from clouds) - A Hail counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Snow-cloud form, complete with a {W} type and {R} Weakness. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Sand Counter - noun, coined by Sunflorazumarill & Carrington388 (named after certain desert windstorms) - A Sand counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Sunflorazumarill-created Sandstorm form, complete with a {F} type and {W} Weakness. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Spring Counter - noun, coined by Sunflorazumarill & Carrington388 (named after the season) - A Spring counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Sunflorazumarill-created Spring form, complete with a {G} type, {R} Weakness, and {W} Resistance. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Storm Counter - noun, coined by Sunflorazumarill & Carrington388 (named after electrically-charged bouts of rain) - A Storm counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Sunflorazumarill-created Storm form, complete with a {L} type, {F} Weakness, and {M} Resistance. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Night Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the time of a day when the sun isn't facing one side of Earth) - A Night counter is a weather counter that affects all Pokémon with Castform in its name in play. This counter will basically make all Pokémon with Castform in its name become its Carrington388-created Night form, complete with a {D} type, {F} Weakness, and {P} Resistance. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    EXP Plus Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Independent Materia from Final Fantasy VII) - An EXP Plus counter is placed on their side of the field. When a player with these counters takes a Prize, for each Prize taken, 1 card per EXP Plus counter on their side of the field is drawn. There is no limit to the number of EXP Plus counters a player can have on their side of the field at any time.

    Miror B. Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Cipher Admin from Pokémon Colosseum and Wanderer from Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness) - One of Miror B.'s hobbies in Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness is stealing other trainers' Shadow Pokémon. Simply put, a Miror B. counter does just that. It basically makes that Pokémon a Pokémon owned by Miror B. When a Miror B. counter is on a Pokémon, it's treated as if it has Miror B. in its name. Miror B. counters can't be placed on Pokémon that have Super, Hyper, or Miror B. in its name. If a Miror B. counter is placed on a non-owner Pokémon (i.e. Pikachu, Dark Marowak, etc.), it treats the card as if it had Miror B. in its name in addition to what was there before (i.e. Miror B.'s Pikachu, Miror B.'s Dark Marowak, etc.). If a Miror B. counter is placed on an ownername Pokémon where the ownername is followed by an apostrophe-S (i.e. Erika's Gloom, Aqua's Kyogre, etc.), it treats the card as if it had Miror B. in its name and not the card's original ownername (i.e. Miror B.'s Gloom, Miror B.'s Kyogre, etc.).

    Shadowsky Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Shadow Pokémon attack from Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness) - A Shadowsky counter is a counter that does 10 damage after each player's turn to all Pokémon in play that don't have Shadow counters on it. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    Malleable Counter - noun, coined by DragonSol (named after the Malleable nature of Ditto)- When a player places a Malleable counter on an opponent's Pokemon, that player chooses one of that Pokemon's attacks. As long as that Pokemon is in play, that Pokemon can't use that attack. The only way to remove the counter is by evolving or devolving the Pokemon. A player can only have 1 Malleable counter on the field at a time.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2005
  5. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 5: Proper Attack Grammar Guidelines

    Index:
    . . How to Properly Phrase Attacks
    . . Attacking Multiple Pokémon and Attack Prerequisites
    . . Searching Attacks, Attacks That Change Base Damage, and Attacks That Switch Pokémon
    . . Misc. Capitalization Details

    Remember, this list is just a guide. NEVER substitute this list with a REAL card (unless that card has been errata’d. The follow the errata). If you have any questions on any of this, try to find a related Pokémon TCG card and read it off there.

    Part 1: How to Properly Phrase Attacks:

    • Stasis ailments are always CAPITALIZED. If an attack poisons a Pokémon, then the word "Poisoned" will be capitalized in that manner. You do NOT leave it lowercased like "poisoned", "paralyzed", etc. It should be "Poisoned", and so on.

    • A MULTIPLIER attack (10x, 20+, 50-) that just does damage is typed as follows:
    "Does XX damage..."
    Example: Goldeen’s Flail attack, from exRS: “Does 10 damage for each damage counter on Goldeen.”

    • A MULTIPLIER attack, or an attack that does extra damage apart from what damage it normally does, that does damage only after something else happened is typed:
    "This attack does XX damage..."

    (Example: Lombre’s Double Scratch attack, from exSS: Flip 2 coins. This attack does 30 damage times the number of heads.)

    This text is different than the one above because of the extra whatevers that happen before damage is done. (The above one goes straight to the damage)

    • Coin flip attacks are typed:
    "Flip a coin. If heads, ....".

    There is a period separating the "flip a coin" part and the "If heads" part. After "if heads", there is a comma. For attacks that do MULTIPLE coin flips, replace the "a" with the number you want (and add an "s" to coin for proper grammar).

    For attacks that do multiple coin flips based on something else (like Energy on the Defending Pokémon, etc.), then the "Flip a coin" part will be:
    "Flip a number of coins equal to [something]. This attack....".

    Then replace [something] with anything you want.
    • Coin flip attacks that have both a head and a tails effect are typed:
    "Flip a coin. If heads, XXX. If tails, ..."

    The same goes as the above attack with heads, however AFTER the "heads" effect goes through, it's followed by a period (.) (NOT a comma or semicolon). The "If" in "If tails" IS capitalized.

    • If one of those attacks does extra damage for a heads, then the attack should be:
    "Flip a coin. If heads, this attack does XX damage plus YY more damage; if tails, this attack does XX damage."
    (Example: Aron's Steel Headbutt, from exSS.)

    • If an attack does nothing on tails (or heads), then the attack should be:
    "Flip a coin. If tails, this attack does nothing."

    (Example: Combusken’s Lunge attack, from exRS: "Flip a coin. If tails, this attack does nothing.".)
    That's how it's written out.

    • Stasis ailment attack are:
    "(Flip a coin. If heads,) the Defending Pokémon is now..."

    The "flip a coin. if heads" part is optional (If you choose not to, capitalize the T in "the". )

    The word "Defending Pokémon" is capitalized in that manner. It is NOT supposed to be lower cased.

    A "then" may be added in front of "the Defending...", IF and ONLY IF the attack does not sound correct without a word "then". (Like if the attack was: During your opponent's turn, if your opponent attaches an Energy Card to the Defending Pokémon, then the Defending Pokémon is now Paralyzed. Without the "then" part, the attack would sound awkward.)

    • Attacks that don't do Weakness or Resistance to the Defending Pokémon are typed:
    "Don't apply Weakness and Resistance for this attack. (Any other effects that happen after applying Weakness and Resistance still happen.)"

    (Example: Sabrina's Drowzee's Mind Shock attack.)

    [If you have an attack like Swift, the proper phrasing today is “This attack’s damage isn’t affected by Weakness, Resistance, Poké-Powers, Poké-Bodies, or any other effects on the Defending Pokémon.” Source: Dark Sandslash, exRR.)

    Notice the words Weakness and Resistance are capitalized in that manner.

    • Attacks that don't do Weakness or Resistance to the BENCHED Pokémon are typed:
    "(Don't apply Weakness and Resistance for Benched Pokémon.)"

    (Example: Fossil Magneton's Self Destruct attack.)

    Notice the words Weakness and Resistance are capitalized in that manner.

    • If an attack as an effect AFTER you apply both Weakness and Resistance, it should be typed:
    "(after applying Weakness and Resistance)"

    (Example: Pelipper’s Swallow attack.)

    Notice the words Weakness and Resistance are capitalized in that manner.

    Part 2: Attacking Multiple Pokémon and Attack Prerequisites

    • Attacks that do damage or other effects to an unknown Pokémon (2 to 5, not specific about Benched) are typed:
    "Choose X of your opponent's Pokémon. This attack does..."

    (Example: Manectric’s Gigashock attack.)

    First the attack tells you to choose X number of Pokémon (in that EXACT phrase in quotes above). Then it uses the "This attack does" phrase.

    • Attacks that do damage or other effects to a BENCHED Pokémon are typed:
    "If your opponent has any Benched Pokémon, choose X of them (or 1 if he or she only has 1). This attack does..."

    (Example: Erika's Venusaur's Wide Solarbeam attack.)

    The "if your opponent ...." phrase is added to the attack. If the attack tells you to specifically choose 2 or more Pokémon, then the "or 1 if he or she..." part of the attack is added. (Otherwise don't add in that part of the attack.)
    • Attacks that do damage or other effects to a BENCHED Pokémon are typed:
    "If your opponent has any Benched Pokémon, choose X of them (or 1 if he or she only has 1). This attack does..."

    (Example: Erika's Venusaur's Wide Solarbeam attack.)

    The "if your opponent ...." phrase is added to the attack. If the attack tells you to specifically choose 2 or more Pokémon, then the "or 1 if he or she..." part of the attack is added. (Otherwise don't add in that part of the attack.)

    • Discarding attacks that tell you to discard something as a COST to use the attack are written:
    "Discard [something] attached to [one of your own Pokémon] in order to use this attack."

    (Example: Any Flamethrower attack.)

    Remember, this form of discarding is a COST in order to use the attack.

    • Discarding attacks that tell you to discard something as an EFFECT of using the attack are written:
    "Discard [something] attached to [a Pokémon]."

    (Example: Blaine's Ninetails attack.)

    Remember, this form of discarding is a EFFECT in order to use the attack. You can still use the attack if you can't discard what's stated.

    • Discarding attacks that tell you to discard something SPECIFIC in order to alter the final result of the attack are written:
    "You may discard (any number) of [something] attached to [one of your Pokémon] when you use this attack. If you do, ...."

    (Example: Fossil Moltres' Wildfire attack.)

    Since this is optional, the "you may" part has been added. "(Any Number)" could be 2, "up to 5", all, or anything else you can think of. Then after the sentence about discarding, it adds the "if you do" part. That's so if you did discard, then the effect happens, and if you did it, no special effect happens.

    Part 3: Searching Attacks, Attacks That Change Base Damage, and Attacks That Switch Pokémon

    • Attacks that allow you to search for something are written:
    "Search your deck for [xxxx] . Show that card to your opponent, then put it (into your hand)/(onto your Bench). Shuffle your deck afterward."

    (Example: Misty's Tentacool (rare) attack.)

    If you're searching for:

    • a Basic Pokémon, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "a Basic Pokémon card"

    • an Evolution Pokémon card, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "an Evolution card"

    • a SPECIFIC Basic Pokémon, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "a Basic Pokémon named [something]"

    • a SPECIFIC Evolution Pokémon card, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "an Evolution card named [something]"

    • any Pokémon card, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "a Basic Pokémon or Evolution card..."

    • a Basic Energy card, then the [xxxx] on the attack will be:
    "a Basic Energy card"

    And so on. If you can search your deck for ANY card, then you don't need to add in the "Show that card to your opponent" part. On an aside, it would be “Search your deck for any X card”, where X is a number. Add “s” to “card” if X is a whole number greater than 1.

    • If an attack CHANGES the base damage of another attack, it is written:
    "During your next turn, [this Pokémon]'s [attack]'s base damage is [varies]"

    (Example: Fossil Scyther and Lt. Surge's Rattata's attack of that type.)

    The "varies" part... well... varies! On card like Scyther, it's specific, only if the damage done is specific.
    "....base damage is 60 instead of 30."

    For cards which damage is NOT SPECIFIC, like Lt. Surge's Rattata's Quick attack, it only says doubled or tripled or whatever... but only because it's not specific on what the attack may do.
    "....base damage is doubled."

    It could do 10 base damage, or 30 base damage. To avoid confusion (and extra long game text), it's written as doubled.

    • If an attack switches your opponent's Pokémon, and your opponent chooses, include this line:
    “If your opponent has any Benched Pokémon, he or she chooses 1 of them and switches it with his or her Active Pokémon.”

    • If an attack switches your opponent's Pokémon, and you choose, include this line:
    “Choose 1 of your opponent’s Benched Pokémon and switch it with the Defending Pokémon.”

    (Example: Jungle Rhydon's Ram attack.)

    Note the "Do the damage before switching Pokémon." part, and also note it's in parenthesis "( )", and in italics.

    The same goes with if an attach has you switch the Pokémon with one on your bench.... just replace "his or her" or whatever with "your" and such.

    Remember, this list is just a guide. NEVER substitute this list with a REAL card (unless that card has been errata’d. The follow the errata). If you have any questions on any of this, try to find a related Pokémon TCG card and read it off there.

    Part 4: Misc. Capitalization Details

    Key words that can NOT be lowercased are:

    * Bench*
    * Knock Out*
    * Basic
    * Pokémon
    * Trainer
    * Pokémon Power
    * Poké-Power*
    * Poké-Body*
    * The Name of a Pokémon/Attack/Power/etc...
    * Weakness
    * Resistance
    * Asleep
    * Burned
    * Confused
    * Poisoned
    * Paralyzed
    * Energy
    * Prize
    * "Defending Pokémon"
    * "Active Pokémon"
    * Stadium


    (* This also includes other words which are basically the same... like Bench, Benched, Benching, etc.)
    Key words that can NOT be uppercased (unless at the beginning of a sentence) are:

    * damage*
    * counter
    * cost
    * pay
    * attack*
    * draw
    * deck
    * discard pile
    * card
    * attach*
    * in play
    * opponent*
    * shuffle
    * coin
    * player*
    * itself
    * nothing

    (* This also includes other words which are basically the same... like attach, attaching, attached, etc.)

    There are some odd ones: evolve and its forms depend on where it is being used: it will be lowercase in effects, but not when it is an attack against an "Evolved Pokémon". You also say when doing stage that it "Evolves from (previous stage)".
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2006
  6. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 6: Lucanian Standard Card Format (LSCF)

    Below is an outline for LSCF, an easy way to organize a card. Rarity, Card Number, Card ID Number (the series of 9 alphanumeric symbols in groups of 3), and Picture are not usually necessary but are nice additions to a card. Take out the squiggly brackets when doing the card though.

    ID Numbers help in sets with more than 1 copy of a Pokémon with the same name, or when referencing the Experienced Mechanic, but are not really necessary otherwise.

     
    Last edited: Oct 27, 2005
  7. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 7: Well Known CaCers in the Pokegym.net Forum

    ~-o-~

    MegaVelocibot
    (formerly LorakLucan)
    "Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, Or what's a heaven for?"
    Robert Browning (1812 - 1889): British poet. Men and Women, "Andrea del Sarto"

    Last edited: 05/04/06​

    Personal Information: The author of this Guide, Lorak is a freshman in college, and has been a member of Pokegym.net for over a year. He has had some success as creating decks. However, he is not active in tournaments, and has only been in one event, taking a top 16 position at the New Jersey States tournament. Lorak has experience with Macromedia Flash and Adobe Photoshop. Occasionally, he will make image fakes of his cards, or just the pictures for them when words are not enough. He has also created the avatars "Team Magma's Groudon and Maxie" or "Team Aqua's Kyogre and Archie" for a contest hosted at Pokegym.net, but personally will not affiliate himself with either of those teams. He is, however, a member of the CACTI 5 and the Archetype Brothers, and is a Pokémon Professor.

    Status in the CaC Community: At the time this article is being written, Lorak is a member of the CACTI 5. Such was not always the case though. Back a while ago, there was a group known as Team CaC. There was a schism, and the rogue group, the Lucanian Lunasol Corps (LLC) was formed. Eventually, issues were resolved, and the reunited group eventually became known as the CACTI (Create A Card Team, Inc.), with each person being a CACTUS (Create A Card Team Unit Specialist). The 5 members involved with the formation of this unified group are the CACTI 5: LorakLucan, Burninating_Torchic, PenguinMaster, Lunatone_solrock, and Ancient Pokemon Trainer. PenguinMaster and Lunatone_solrock have not been very active in the CaC community at the writing of this section (10/25/05). LorakLucan is seen as an authority in the CaC forum rests upon, and is generally respected by his peers and those who look up to him. On March 16, CACTI became Renaissance Inc.

    Card Ideas Attributed to LorakLucan: Classic types (term), Neo types (term), Nintendo types (term), Pokémon-!! (term), Pokémon-XA, Lucanian Pokémon (oddly similar to the Delta Species Pokémon of the actual game long before its introduction), Quick Pokémon, Sacrifice Pokémon, Über Pokémon, Pokémon +/-, Pokémon-{XX}, Pokémon juj, Pokémon mod, Pokémon o_0, Epsilon's Pokémon

    Fake Card Creation: Lorak is more likely to create disruptive effects with his cards rather than brute damage. That's not to say he won't do boostable attacks; his favorite card is Dark Tyranitar from Neo Destiny for this very reason. He prefers to deck opponents or disrupt their hands or decks in some way.

    Fake Card Grading: Lorak is a person who is rather adamant about proper card spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and grammar. These points will have a severe effect on the grade of a card if he is a judge. He doesn't really care as much about how the picture (or text description of such) looks on a card. He may take a bit of a sarcastic tone when correcting someone after trying to correct a newer person gently, but not as quickly as other people will be to jump on the person for making mistakes. He will also say "Eat that," as a taunt, when someone fails multiple times to use proper card grammar or spell correctly, as the phrase has appeared on two of his cards jesting about poor card grammar. Used to a lesser extent is the phrase "Put on your hat!", for similar reasons. His style is firm but gentle, and he is always willing to direct people to his Guide.

    ~-o-~

    dkates
    Last edited: 10/26/05​

    Dkates’ biggest contributions have been his sets. In his contests, he has tended to be relatively strict and structured in grading (other than the accented e – he is not terribly strict about that, unlike Carrington). Dkates explains any deductions he makes in a contest score. In his sets, he’s more relaxed. He'll still create a lot of structure in his sets, but rather than create a setlist at the beginning, dkates instead creates a theme and then leave the rest mostly up to the cardmaker, intervening only when a card is made unplayable, unworthy, broken, or blatantly counter to the structure dkates sets up, without sufficient reason. In his sets, dkates has absolutely no problem with references being made to other sets from this forum; as a result, it does happen fairly often.

    Dkates started doing CaC on the Wizards Pokegym, or as it has often been referred to, WizPoG. his original style was heavily influenced by Carrington388 and Sunflorazumarill. Since then, he has taken on his own style. Dkates tends to base his limits on real-card precedent, but dkates will evolve those limits a lot more quickly than some other cardmakers. Dkates likes to look for ways to combine mechanics in ways they haven't previously been combined, and sometimes he will create a mechanic by extending an existing one. Dkates uses a fairly structured algorithm for determining base damage and Energy costs for attacks. The basis of this algorithm is that (C) pays for 10 damage, a colored Energy pays for 15 damage, and (M) or (D) pays for roughly 20 damage. Most attack effects can be "costed" according to this formula; for example, automatically causing the Defending Pokemon to become Asleep "costs" 5 damage, or half of a (C). Dkates tends to shy away from most mechanics that have not appeared on real cards, such as the various CaC-only multi-prize mechanics.

    While dkates has not created any prefixes or suffixes, dkates has created one type of Trainer -- the Badge. Badges premiered in the Hoenn Gym Leaders set. While the mechanic has not been used since (at least to his knowledge), there are specific guidelines set up for the type. First, each Badge is restricted to one copy per deck. Second, like Stadiums, Badges remain in play when played, and provide their effects continuously. However, unlike Stadiums, there is no limit to the number of Badges a player can have in play, and their effects are designed to only benefit their owner.
     
    Last edited: May 4, 2006
  8. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 8: (In)Famous Often-Quoted CaC References

    Some things related to cards will not go unforgotten, some mistakes never put to rest.

    "Absol is now sleeping"

    Below is the often misquoted "Absol is now Sleeping" card. Turns out the quote should be "Absol is noow sleeping". This is as bad as things can get without Babelfish mangling. It comes, funny enough, from the " SO, YOU are a Good Create a Carder? Enter the Contest!!" Create-a-Card Thread. Well, with no further ado, here it is, in its tainted glory.

    To be descalificated

    From the thread "Semifinals For:Gold and Silver Legends", a maimed spelling of "disqualified" becomes a legend itself.

    CACTI Chat’s Lickitung (Babelfish's n00b)
    I got fed up with crappy grammar plaguing the CaC forum. This is the result...
    Remember, if you want something to be referenced in this section, just send me a PM. I'll probably be glad to add it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2006
  9. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

  10. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Section 10: Kudos

    I wish to thank the following:
    You, for reading this. Hopefully you learned something. :p
    *cough*me*cough*, for all the time and effort he put into making this the most thorough CaC resource for this forum.
    Carrington388, for his many special counter submissions and clarifications of his mechanics, in addition to Kanto Gym Leader descriptions.
    Pokegym.net, for having a CaC community as good as this.
    ...? , for the thread sticky.
    Burninating_Torchic, ZoraJolteon, PenguinmMaster, and Lunatone_Solrock, for all the creativity and competition they provided in the past.
    dkates, who, in retrospection, did have quite a bit that helped us out three years ago. There, now you're in the thread, albeit in a very belated way.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2008
  11. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Part 11: Stuff to Organize:

    The PokeGym - Forums; http://pokegym.net/forums
    Private Message Dump for User LorakLucan; 11/28/2005 04:36 PM -->

    ################################################################################
    Folder : Inbox
    ################################################################################

    ================================================================================
    From : Carrington388
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-25 16:27
    Title : Special Counter Descriptions Part 5
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Miror B. Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Cipher Admin from Pokémon Colosseum and Wanderer from Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness) - One of Miror B.'s hobbies in Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness is stealing other trainers' Shadow Pokémon. Simply put, a Miror B. counter does just that. It basically makes that Pokémon a Pokémon owned by Miror B. When a Miror B. counter is on a Pokémon, it's treated as if it has Miror B. in its name. Miror B. counters can't be placed on Pokémon that have Super, Hyper, or Miror B. in its name. If a Miror B. counter is placed on a non-owner Pokémon (i.e. Pikachu, Dark Marowak, etc.), it treats the card as if it had Miror B. in its name in addition to what was there before (i.e. Miror B.'s Pikachu, Miror B.'s Dark Marowak, etc.). If a Miror B. counter is placed on an ownername Pokémon where the ownername is followed by an apostrophe-S (i.e. Erika's Gloom, Aqua's Kyogre, etc.), it treats the card as if it had Miror B. in its name and not the card's original ownername (i.e. Miror B.'s Gloom, Miror B.'s Kyogre, etc.).

    Shadowsky Counter - noun, coined by Carrington388 (named after the Shadow Pokémon attack from Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness) - A Shadowsky counter is a counter that does 10 damage after each player's turn to all Pokémon in play that don't have Shadow counters on it. Only 1 of any combination of Sun, Rain, Hail, Sand, Spring, Storm, Night, and Shadowsky counters can be in play at any time.

    And that's the last of the special counters.

    ================================================================================
    From : Carrington388
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-25 19:19
    Title : Some owner descriptions...
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    First off, Pokegym-Used Trainers should have a "Misc." section that should involve trainers not involved in crossovers.

    Secondly, here are descriptions I'll whip up for some gym leaders:

    Brock - coined by NOA - Pewter City Gym Leader. Specializes in Rock-type Pokémon. Brock's Rock-types are typically {F} type in the TCG. Non-Rock types have their types like normal.

    Misty - coined by NOA - Cerulean City Gym Leader. Specializes in Water-type Pokémon. Misty's Water-types are typically {W} type in the TCG. Non-Water types have their types like normal.

    Lt. Surge - coined by NOA - Vermillion City Gym Leader. Specializes in Electric-type Pokémon. Lt. Surge's Electric-types are typically {L} type in the TCG. Non-Electric types have their types like normal.

    Erika - coined by NOA - Celadon City Gym Leader. Specializes in Grass-type Pokémon. Erika's Grass-types are typically {G} type in the TCG. Non-Grass types have their types like normal.

    Koga - coined by NOA - Fuschia City Gym Leader. Specializes in Poison-type Pokémon. Koga's Poison-types are typically {G} type in the TCG. Non-Poison types have their types like normal.

    Sabrina - coined by NOA - Saffron City Gym Leader. Specializes in Psychic-type Pokémon. Sabrina's Psychic-types are typically {P} type in the TCG. Non-Psychic types have their types like normal.

    Blaine - coined by NOA - Cinnabar Island Gym Leader. Specializes in Fire-type Pokémon. Blaine's Fire-types are typically {R} type in the TCG. Non-Fire types have their types like normal.

    Giovanni - coined by NOA - Viridian City Gym Leader and boss of Team Rocket. As gym leader, specializes in Ground-type Pokémon. Giovanni's Ground-types are typically {F} type in the TCG. Non-Ground types have their types like normal.

    ================================================================================
    From : DragonSol
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-25 21:20
    Title : CaC Guide
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Just wanted to ask if you would include a counter I made in my Advance Wars set, on Koal's Ditto. The Malleable counter prevents one of your opponent's Pokemon from using an attack selected by you. It's like a permanent amnesia for one attack, except the counter can be removed by evolving/devolving a Pokemon. Just thought that if you want it to be complete, you could add it in there...

    ================================================================================
    From : DragonSol
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-25 21:33
    Title : Re: CaC Guide
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Okay, here it is:

    Malleable Counter- noun, coined by DragonSol (named after the Malleable nature of Ditto)- When a player places a Malleable counter on an opponent's Pokemon, the player chooses one of that Pokemon's attacks. As long as that Pokemon is in play, that Pokemon can't use that attack. The only way to remove the counter is by Evolving or Devolving the Pokemon. A player can only have 1 Pre-Emptive counter on the field at a time.

    Hope its okay for you!

    ================================================================================
    From : dkates
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-26 12:55
    Title : CaC guide
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I haven't created any prefixes or suffixes. I think I can trust you to write a description of me -- my main contributions to the CaC community have been my crossover sets (such as the Mega Man X set) and the Hoenn Gym Leaders set; I've also run a number of contests -- not all of which I actually got around to grading...:redface:

    ================================================================================
    From : Carrington388
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-26 16:17
    Title : Some Set Links...
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Here's the set of lunatone_solrock's links. You can get them by copying them from the reply box. An asterisk denotes a set that was never completed while a caret denotes a currently in-progress set:

    EX: The Beginning*
    EX: Beyond the Rainbow
    EX: The Origins*
    EX: Hidden Laboratory
    EX: Contest Challenge*
    EX: Ashes
    EX: Aquatic Labyrinth
    EX: Pioneers
    EX: Meteor Shower
    EX: Sky Kingdom^


    Here's the links to all of the completed or in-progress sets (other than promo sets) started by either me, Sunflorazumarill, or dkates. Of the three CaCers whose sets are in this list, only dkates has left sets incomplete, such sets are not listed below.

    Sonic Series
    Sonic Adventure 2 Battle (Set 1) (Originated Wizards)
    Sonic Adventure R/S
    Sonic Adventure Evolution
    Sonic Heroes Expansion

    Evil Team Series (Includes Cipher/Snagem Sets)
    Magma/Aqua/Flora Axis
    Plasma/Rocket Ambitions
    Cipher/Snagem Threat
    Pokémon Colosseum Set
    Cipher/Snagem Crisis
    Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness: Cipher/Snagem Resurrection

    Crossover Sets (Other Than Sonic Sets)
    Mega Man X
    Mega Man Revolutions
    The Final Fantasy VII Set
    Teen Titans
    Disney's Aladdin

    Other Sets (Includes All-Star Sets With Evil Teams)
    Knockaround Girls (Originated Wizards)
    Orange League Masters 2
    Pokémon League Guys
    Hoenn League Masters
    Johto League Masters 3
    Shining/Crystal/ex Alliance
    Dark/Light Conflict
    Hoenn Gym Leaders
    Pokémon Emerald Set
    Missed Opportunities
    Pokémon Star Constellation

    ================================================================================
    From : DragonSol
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-26 22:02
    Title : Hmm
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    On your guide, I saw the cross over sets, which are based off of T.V. shows or games, right? Would you mind adding my Advance Wars set to it?

    ================================================================================
    From : DragonSol
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-26 22:09
    Title : Re: Hmm
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    None of the other sets listed there has a description, so I guess mine will be the first!

    Advance Wars Set- Created by DragonSol. A set based off of the three Advance Wars games for the GBA and the DS.

    Thanks!

    ================================================================================
    From : dkates
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-26 22:32
    Title : Re: CaC guide
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Tell ya what. I'll let you do the actual writing, I'll just make notes on info to include. Edit the following as you see fit, and to add your own observations, as long as you include all of the relevant infolrmation.

    As I mentioned before, my biggest contributions have been my sets. In my contests, I've tended to be relatively strict and structured in grading (other than the accented e -- I'm not terribly strict about that, unlike Carrington). I explain any deductions I make in a contest score. In my sets, I'm more relaxed. I'll still create a lot of structure in my sets, but rather than create a setlist at the beginning, I instead create a theme and then leave the rest mostly up to the cardmaker, intervening only when a card is made unplayable, unworthy, broken, or blatantly counter to the structure I set up, without sufficient reason. In my sets, I have absolutely no problem with references being made to other sets from this forum; as a result, it does happen fairly often.

    I started doing CaC on the Wizards Pokegym, or as it has often been referred to, WizPoG. My original style was heavily influenced by Carrington388 and Sunflorazumarill. Since then, I've taken on my own style. I tend to base my limits on real-card precedent, but I evolve those limits a lot more quickly than some cardmakers (*coughCarringtoncough*). I like to look for ways to combine mechanics in ways they haven't previously been combined, and sometimes I create a mechanic by extending an existing one. I use a fairly structured algorithm for determining base damage and Energy costs for attacks. The basis of this algorithm is that (C) pays for 10 damage, a colored Energy pays for 15 damage, and (M) or (D) pays for roughly 20 damage. Most attack effects can be "costed" according to this formula; for example, automatically causing the Defending Pokemon to become Asleep "costs" 5 damage, or half of a (C). I tend to shy away from most mechanics that have not appeared on real cards, such as the various CaC-only multi-prize mechanics.

    While I have not created any prefixes or suffixes, I have created one type of Trainer -- the Badge. Badges premiered in the Hoenn Gym Leaders set. While the mechanic has not been used since (at least to my knowledge), there are specific guidelines set up for the type. First, each Badge is restricted to one copy per deck. Second, like Stadiums, Badges remain in play when played, and provide their effects continuously. However, unlike Stadiums, there is no limit to the number of Badges a player can have in play, and their effects are designed to only benefit their owner.

    ================================================================================
    From : DragonSol
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-28 15:56
    Title : Re: Hey
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Its fine, I was just wondering. Also, I made a new counter, so here it is!

    Weed Counter- noun, coined by DragonSol. While a Weed counter is on a Pokémon, that Pokémon is also a (G) type in addition to whatever types it already was. If it was a dual-type, it is now a triple-type.

    If you have a question about it, just ask!

    ================================================================================
    From : dkates
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-29 12:34
    Title : CaC Guide -- again
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I must say, I like how the guide is shaping up. I still need to type up the info on my attack costing guidelines, but in the meantime, two things I wanted to point out. First off, the info on the Badge mechanic should probably go in an appropriate section, not just in my bio -- in fact, the details about Badges probably shouldn't be in the bio. Also, I'm wondering whether leaving my Hoenn Gym Leaders set out of the list of significant CaC sets was intentional. Don't worry, I'm not about to ask that all of my sets be included -- other than HGL and the ones already listed, I think it's safe to say that the rest of my sets all basically bombed. Including the Aladdin set in that section strikes me as quite a vote of confidence, and I appreciate it.

    ================================================================================
    From : dkates
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-29 15:02
    Title : Re: CaC Guide -- again
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Hoenn Gym Leaders: http://pokegym.net/forums/showthread.php?t=18233

    Super Smash Brothers: Melee:
    http://pokegym.net/forums/showthread.php?t=1631

    Check out the SSBM set before you decide whether it really deserves to be noted. I started it a little over two years ago. It never did get finished (and it's way too late now), but it got to 77 posts -- and a pretty nice number of cards -- before it finally died about 9 months after I started it. You actually posted a Pokemon for that set, although I wasn't willing to accept it because it broke the rules (even after you edited) and was way too broken.

    ================================================================================
    From : Archonn
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-10-30 08:31
    Title : Experienced Pokés!
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I was thinking... Where do Experienced and Traits go on your guide? Both of them can be applied to any card, not just Pokémons... And since the guide has no section for Trainer-related Mechanics, i wonder where you will place Strongholds (alongside with dkates' Badges, too). For now, i'll pm you the Experienced Pokémon mechanic, as it is the only mechanic with a defined place.

    Here's the general guidelines for Experienced Pokémon, converted in the LSFC (instead of my usual format)

    {Pokémon’s name = Experienced X [Original Pokémon's name]}
    {Type (of Pokémon): {color}}
    {Pokémon’s HP}
    {Evolution Stage of Pokémon = Stage [Original Pokémon's stage number+X] Pokémon - Evolves from [Experienced X-1 Original Pokémon] [Original's Card ID number]}
    {Weakness}
    {Resistance}
    {Retreat Cost}
    {Rarity}
    {Card Number}
    {Card ID Number}

    {Picture}

    Poké-Power - {Name of Poké-Power}
    {Effects of Poké-Power}.

    Poké-Body - {Name of Poké-Body}
    {Effects of Poké-Body}.

    {Cost of Attack} - {Name of Attack} - {Base Damage}
    {Effects of attack, if any}

    {Cost of Attack} - {Name of Attack} - {Base Damage}
    {Effects of attack, if any}

    So... yeah, it doesn't change much. If you want that i fit it in your usual rubric for Pokémon descriptors, tell me to do so. To do a Experienced Pokémon, first choose a Pokémon, then a number, which will be X. X can be any integer number (yes, even negatives, something i never bothered to explain back at my set, but will do later), except for zero, since choosing zero is technically repeating the same card. You may change all instances of Experienced 0 in a card to Basic, and you may switch Experienced 1 with just Experienced. After that, resume CaCing as normal, never forgetting to balance accordingly with the Evolution Stage (If you thought Pokémon-!! were hard to balance properly, try out Stages 4+! If someday the Pokégym forums have a lot of these, we may end up creating Stage-!!... But for now it's better not). Feel free to add something i missed, Lorak.

    There are two things about Experienced that i never mentioned on the forums, but should be also added, for use in the next sets: Inexperienced, and evolving from different pokémons other than the one stated in your name. You may be wondering what Inexperienced is; it is what happens when you use negative numbers in X, in the Exp. mechanic. So whenever you have a Experienced -X, you change it to Inexperienced X. But they have a important difference; Instead of "Evolves from [Experienced X-1 Original Pokémon]", they have "Evolves into [Experienced X+1 Original Pokémon]". And since there's no Stage below basic, all inexperienced versions of Basic Pokémons are also Basic. Pretty similar to Babies, but without the almighty rule... That's why i never bothered to mention them. Last note about them; yeah, you can have a Inexperienced Charizard. Or even a Inexperienced Experienced Busgy's Scyther. Nothing too useful... But it exists.

    The second thing needs some knowledge about Traits. With Traits, you may change any name from your Pokémon into a Trait. But Experienced works a bit differently. Let's imagine i have Experienced Rocket's Dark Gyarados ex. Since this name is too big, i should change some names into Traits. For example, its name could become Experienced Gyarados ex, so it should have the Pokémon ex Traits, the Dark Pokémon Trait and the Rocket's Pokémon Trait. Or it could have the Rocket's Dark Pokémon Trait and the Pokémon ex Trait. Or the Dark Pokémon ex Trait and the Rocket's Pokémon Trait. Or... Well, you get it. With Experienced, things work differently. If it's alone (just Experienced X Pokémon), then fine. But if you have, for example, Experienced Gyarados Pokémon, then instead of evolving from its normal name, it evolves from Gyarados instead (of course, normal specific card rule applies, the ID number for the correct Gyarados is mentioned in the Evolves from/into... field)! Keep in mind, however, that its name will still count as both its traits and what it is in the name field. This is useful for pokémons that went through a name change. For easier understanding, let's think that a Protoss High Templar (You do know Starcraft, right? It's listed there as one of your interests) is a Pokémon, and the Protoss Archon (+n=my nick! It is on purpose, BTW) is a Experienced version of it. But since it is a Archon, if we just put its name as Experienced Archon, it would evolve from a card that doesn't exist, and if we put its name as Experienced High Templar... Well...It wouldn't be an Archon. The solution? Its name is Archon, but with the Experienced High Templar Pokémon Trait. Sightly more useful than Inexperienced pokémons, IMO, but still...


    What a loong PM. And disorganized, too. I'm waiting for an answer about how should i organize the info about Traits, Strongholds and the rest of the Experienced Mechanic. And i'm sorry to make you read such a huge amount of not so necessary info.

    ================================================================================
    From : Archonn
    To : LorakLucan
    Date : 2005-11-02 11:55
    Title : The rest (of mechanics for the guide)!
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    I still have to finish Experienced, add Traits, and Strongholds. Let's start...

    Experienced cards that aren't Pokémon are easy to do. They must only have a drawback if not played while all of its previous versions are each either in play or in your discard pile. Otherwise, it's just a normal card, sightly more powerful thanks to the drawback. Now on to the Trainer/Energy format (not LSCF because, well, there isn't one for Trainers/Energies)...

    -------------------
    Experienced X [Name of original card]
    [Insert this card's type here]
    Unless you have [Experienced X-1 [Name of original card], Experienced X-2 [Name of original card], Experienced X-3 [Name of original card], ... and [Name of original card]] each either in play or in your discard pile, [Insert problem here]. [Insert card effects here]
    -------------------

    Yeah, a format that uses summation. Back on the subject... There isn't any Inexperienced Trainers or Energies (if you have a suggestion, though... I don't think it is really necessary). Also, having a name while being the Experienced version of another is not a defined mechanic when dealing with Trainers/Energies; in this case, it is completely useless (IMO).

    Next mechanic: Traits. These keywords are things that stay between the picture of a card and the normal text of it. For more examples, check L5R CCG cards (google for it! In L5R, Traits are always bolded, and are more common in Personality cards, a type of card in that game). Most traits are Flavor Text/Pokédex Info; for example, all Pokémons in the Gym Clash Contest set have a trait that sort of indicates what they were trained for. However, three kinds of Traits change the gameplay.

    First one is Reference Traits. By themselves, they are only flavor text, but any card may reference a Trait. Nothing complicated here, and this was the kind of gameplay-affecting Trait seen in the Gym Clash Contest set.

    The second one is the Rulebook Trait. You just determinate that all rulebooks have a entry that says that all cards with a certain trait gain a certain rule, and it's over. For example, L5R has a very interesting Trait that i will add on future sets: the Soul of [Insert card name]. The rulebook states that all cards with that trait have the following rule; "This card counts as [Insert card name] for deckbuilding purposes." Nice, but don't create a Trait for every rule you want or else people will spend more time in the rulebook trying to figure out what certain trait does than playing the game itself.

    Last but not least, we have Name Traits (which in fact are a kind of Rulebook Trait, since they are traits with a rule attached to them). Any Trait with Pokémon in it that is in a Pokémon card is a Name Trait. Simply put, all Pokémons with a Name Trait are considered to have all words (except for the Pokémon word) from that Trait in their name. For example, A Togetic with the Dark Rocket's Pokémon ex Trait has all of that words in its name. Also, if you have preffixes or suffixes that give rules but they are in a Name Trait form, their rules still apply (so our Togetic example will give two prizes if knocked out). I guess that this is enough; feel free to ask if you still have doubts. And i think that Traits should go between the Picture and the rest of the card in the LSCF.

    Finally, we have Strongholds. These trainers have the following rule (the part in parenthesis is not in the rule!): "You may only have 1 Stronghold in your deck. Strongholds do not count for your maximum deck size. Before (Use "deciding who goes first" here if you are playing with the old starting rules, or use "shuffling your deck for the first time this game" here if you are playing with the new starting rules), if you have a Stronghold in your deck, search for it and place it in play. A Stronghold cannot leave play."

    So what does it means? Well, it means that you may choose to have a Stronghold in your deck or not, and if you have, it alters how you play the game. Also, Strongholds are the only cards that enter play before anything else happens, so they are the only cards that may alter the starting procedure. But Strongholds must be balanced, be it using a negative effect for you, a benefitial effect for the opponent, or making its effect balance itself (like the Professors Conference Center, a Stronghold with the following effect: "Between turns, when your turn was the last, count the number of cards in your hand. Then, shuffle your hand into your deck and draw the counted number of cards." In short, even if you get a good hand, you will end up shuffling it back!). These are pretty easy to understand, aren't they?

    Yet another enormous PM. Fortunately, this is probably the last (this big, that is). Now let's see how you will organize all this mess... If you want any help, or if something is still unclear, feel free to ask. And thanks for spending your time reading this!
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2005
  12. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Last edited: Feb 20, 2008
  13. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    (another tab)
     
  14. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    Footnotes of the Author: A Reflection Upon the Change of the Game

    The world is a constantly changing place. At the time that I wrote this article, I could have never imagined the way this game would, well, evolve. It saddens me to say I dropped out at the announcement of the first Diamond and Pearl set. I couldn't get over the fact of the fundamentals of Weakness and Resistance changing, and for once could relate to Carrington388. As I faded from the game, so to did I from the card faking.

    I apologize, as a result, if this guide does not hold true to principles of this new game; whatever it is, it isn't the Pokemon TCG I grew up playing.

    Occasionally, I look back upon this, and smile. I remember some great times had in this forum, a summer of competitions... but it's gone now for me. I miss it, to be honest, but I can't adapt and, as the others in evolution who fail to adapt, must perish. There's a new generation of players and card fakers. It's their turn to shine.

    Sincerely,
    MegaVelocibot
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2008
  15. ensignmerlin

    ensignmerlin New Member

  16. meditite rox

    meditite rox New Member

    Which is why I even made mine... because I thought that if one was made, it would have been stickied.
     
  17. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    PLEASE KEEP ALL COMMENTS ON THE THREAD IN THIS LINK.

    But thanks for the posts. :D Somehow, it got someone's attention, and got this stickied, so I suppose I have much to be grateful for...
     
  18. MegaVelocibot

    MegaVelocibot <a href="http://pokegym.net/gallery/browseimages.p

    An ancient addendum: Pokemon SP no longer refer to what Burninating_Torchic coined years ago, but to an entirely different mechanic. Some help with a write-up would be appreciated, but I am working on one now:

    Nintendo Pokemon SP:
    Evolution: Basic Pokemon (or Lv.X), must be final evolution.
    Prefix / Suffix: Suffix of C (for Champion), FB (for Frontier Brain), 4 (actually Japanese symbol for 4, Elite Four member), GL (Gym Leader), or G (Team Galactic).
    HP: Varies, usually -10 HP from normal, ±10 HP (Basic), +40, give or take, for Lv.X
    Weaknesses: One x2
    Resistance: Normal if it has one.
    Retreat Cost: Normal, sometimes -C
    Powers/Bodies/Attacks: Somewhat stronger than normal Basic Pokemon, somewhat weaker than proper evolution. Lv. X is usually on-par with other Lv. Xs,

    In addition, though I'm sure it's redundant, Weakness and Resistance have gone wonky for DP and Platinum sets, but Weakness seems to be going back to normal for HGSS sets. No clue about Resistance.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2010
  19. dinhthopikachu

    dinhthopikachu New Member

    have received a request for a guide for fake card guidelines, so here I go, in an attempt to post a good one. This will be an ongoing effort. In this guide, I host a vast amount of information for usage in this forum. If you've been directed here by someone, you most likely will want to reference Section 5 (Proper Attack Grammar Guidelines) or Section 6 (Lucanian Standard Card Format (LSCF)). If you're looking for inspiration, feel free to drift through Section 2 (Prefixes, Suffixes, and Other Mechanics), Section 3: (Owners (Trainers and Teams)), or Section 4 (Special Counters). Who knows... if you make big enough a name for yourself in this forum (good or bad), you may find your work referenced here!
     

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