What makes you a "Good Trainer"?

Discussion in 'Deck Help and Strategy' started by GOROY, Jan 22, 2004.

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  1. GOROY

    GOROY New Member

    In a lot of these threads about top decks in the formats, some of the deck help threads too, many people are arguing that the best players will win, and you have to be skilled to to good in this game. So, what makes a skilled player? How do you know if your good or not. Also, for the best decks, can a novice do good with a great deck? How do you do this, and make yourself a "skilled player"?
     
  2. Bigpoppabeatdown

    Bigpoppabeatdown New Member

    hmmm well that's a great question

    to put it simply

    a great player is one who knows every aspect of their deck........ has come to expect everything from their opponent, and has the abilility to recognize the weaknesses in their decks and their opponents

    that player will be able to fix their deck to minimize their weakness

    and likewise that player, during the battle, will be able to exploit their opponent's weaknesses



    a novice will be able to do good with a great deck against normal decks, so-so against good decks, and below average against other great decks

    it is the skill of the player that depends on the full potential of the deck

    and i know it sounds bad, but the skill comes from the practice battles, tourneys and continuously looking over the cards, realizing the awesome combos that you can make

    well that's my definition

    anybody agree?
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2004
  3. AbsolutelyNobody

    AbsolutelyNobody New Member

    I whole-hartedly agree with Bigpoppabeatdown. I think a great player should be able to thing on the spot, and come up with an alternate strategy with the same deck, if need be. A great player could probably pick up a deck, built decently well, and with a few minutes they could hold their own with it (as long as it is playable and built well. (I know this sounds kindof weak)A great player probably can get the cards they need by trading, or buying, or whatever. I don't think i've ever seen a great player, but seen a few good ones, so a great player would truly be insiring to see.

    Yes, pathetic, but coming after such a powerful post, it was all I could think of.

    Oh, and they should be a member of the Pokegym if at all possible :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2004
  4. yoshi1001

    yoshi1001 New Member

    A player is to judged by their contribution to the game, either in playing, deckbuilding, demeanor, or philosiphy.
     
  5. Tyranitar666

    Tyranitar666 New Member

    Two words- STANTLER TecH...plus, having the name Chris Fulop or Levi Canfield doesn't hurt either.
     
  6. mysterioustrainer

    mysterioustrainer New Member

    My definition of a Pokemon Master: A person that will take any honest and possible way to win, to never give up and to always keep trying and evolving. Most importanly of all to have fun what he/she does and never stop playing the game. He/she has one goal, To become the best pokemon trainer in the world.

    Of course working to become the best shouldn't be clouded with overego, obession, or anger. These qualities define a poor pokemon trainer. However it never hurts to shed a tear when the battle really counted.
     
  7. Silver Chaos

    Silver Chaos New Member

    Someone whose got attitude. Have you ever heard someone say "Give it 110%"? How is that possible? You can push yourself higher than what you can do. If you were to assign a number to each letter of the alphabet like this: A being 1 B being 2 C being 3, out of all the phrases like "hard work", only attitude adds up to 100. So having the attitude, the determination to win is what makes a good trainer. I think using your favorite pokemon is good too, it dosn't matter how strong they are, it just matters if you know how to use them. Also working with what you got shows that you have the skill to work with any deck.
     
  8. ausen

    ausen New Member

    ausen,please be more courteous.You were warned earlier about this.Next time is ....-`Sensei
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 23, 2004
  9. Adv1sor

    Adv1sor New Member

    A good player thinks ahead. He or she recognizes their opponents’ decks early in the game based on the basic pokemon being played and plans accordingly. All of this comes from experience.

    I was able to watch a couple of the higher ranked players earlier this month. I was glad to see the types of decks they were playing and hoped to learn from watching their game. I was disillusioned to see that there style of play included trying to get away with drawing extra cards, forgetting to add damage counters here and there, trying to play an extra energy, that sort of thing.

    Everyone makes mistakes. I understand that. I make plenty myself and I am an experienced player. But to see the number of mistakes these two made in the course of one game made me wonder how much of their higher ranking came from experience, strategy, and solid decks (which they did indeed have) and how much came from cheating unsuspecting less experienced players.

    A really good player contributes to the game by helping other players become better. A really good player knows the difference between a little fun trash talk and a hurtful remark. Remember, some younger kids can't always tell the difference. A really good player knows the rules and never intentionally breaks them.
     
  10. TheAnswer3

    TheAnswer3 New Member

    Fulop ROFL, maybe add my name to that list?

    IMO the best people in our game are the people that have contributed to it the most, and also have been extremely sucessful throughout their time in the game. I personally have been a part of making a few decks that MANY will remember from Neo-On that became the best decks in the format as time wore on Neo4L. But ive also been sucessfull throughout my time in this game, T2ing in both SBZs, Winning a Trip to the Sts, Winning Prereleases and Consistantly doing well at local tournaments. Also what makes a great player is HOW they effect the people around them. I personally dont get to play all that much IRL. But when do attend my local tournaments which include the BEST players in michigan I feel like the enviroment changes and I Dont want to feel conceited saying that. When i show at the pokeshack everyones Ideas change, and I can tell everyone is playing there best taking a run at me. So it all boils down to this i suppose.

    1. Respect
    2. Sucess
    3. Impact
    4. Deckbuilding
    5. Being one of the original Poke-Neoers :)

    tA
     
  11. plaidlesspez

    plaidlesspez New Member

    If you are talking playingwise in a game, then this is what I think.

    A good player has to make a good deck of course. It takes a lot of time to tinker with a deck until it's perfect and you know the strategy of using it against any kind of deck. Making a deck is a really big part. Then next, you have to have good strategy in games.

    In a game with two evenly matched decks, the better player will be able to take full advantage of a mistake by an opponent. If you play against skilled players, it's hard to notice their mistakes sometimes, but when they make one you better take advantage or else it could come back to haunt you. Likewise, a good player will make no mistakes when playing either. They will try to do all they can so there opponent can't get an edge on them.
     
  12. ScythKing

    ScythKing Member

    Ok - seems like a straightforward question - no need to get metaphysical/egotistical about it.
    A great player makes fewer mistakes, makes the best decisions within his options frame (his turn), knows his deck and has a mental image of the decks current state so as to have the best information to make those best decisions mentioned earlier. He also has the ability to think ahead to plan how things are likely to be several moves ahead and knows how to adapt to what actually happens.
    Kinda hard to state clearly but it means simply play like you're playing chess - try to look ahead and chart where the game is going and decide the best moves that will maximize your chance to win. As the game progresses you should alter your strategy to correspond to the reality.
    Example you're playing a Blaziken/Tails deck. You have a lone torchic out front against another basic. You have a Delcatty on the bench, one energy in your hand, one is already on the Torchic out front.
    What to do? Well that depends on many many factors that a great player is able to figure into the correct move. What does the opponent have out, what is he likely to get out (future threats), how does the Blaze/Tails deck function - what does he need to do to get the best setup so the decks works properly, how many energy are in the deck - what's the likeliest cards he will draw if he uses the Cat, how much risk is there to the Torchic, what trainers can he maybe get on the draw that will help - what's the odds, is it a good move to stall/sacrifice the Torchic to try and get a better setup, or use the energy to push the attack. A great player is able to factor all these into his best moves. Say the player also had an Oracle in hand - what two cards to get? Use the energy to get 'em now or go ahead with the attack and get one the next draw. decisions decisions! The great player makes the best ones.
    As far as a novice doing well with a great deck - probbly not. Take the Feraligator decks - people said they were no-brainers but it took skill to use the Wrath and Trash properly. They just didn't work in teh hands of a novice because they didn't understand the engine that made the gator go.
    A great player with a crappy deck - a great player may not win with a crappy deck but he'll play it at it's maximum potential - if he plays with it at all. At Worlds I saw Jeremy drop from a theme deck challenge because of the deck he got (Rocket devastation). I got the same thing - but I was stoopid and tried to make it something. He had way more sense than I had as he had decided that his ranking was worth more than trying to make that dog run. I got creamed and he went to the next event and got a decent deck to build on. Jeremy is a great player and I learned something from him that day.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2004
  13. mysterioustrainer

    mysterioustrainer New Member

    Another factor I should mention... Time and effort. It takes time to become good. I find it hard to see it any other way. Players who spend more time, more effort, and more substance (money for example) will earn more experience and its experience that defines my above statement.
     
  14. Tyranitar666

    Tyranitar666 New Member

    I still think my answer was the most straight and to the point. I was also wrong on the Stantler Tech....I was like really buzzin or somethin on that one. That card just makes you LOSE. Truthfully, it is all about the Trapinch. Im not sure what it does, Im not sure what it evolves into, but it WINS.
     
  15. Broken Lizard

    Broken Lizard New Member

    I think we need to add humility to the list of requirements for greatness... ;)

    And, BTW, I thought that Chris Fulop dude quit Pokémon for Neo Pets! :thumb:
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2004
  16. plaidlesspez

    plaidlesspez New Member

    Wow Jermy, that sure is a lot a playing. Maybe that's why your sooooo good. I don't have much time to play, so I do draws with my deck and just see how fast I get it set up. That usually tells me whether it's working or not, but I'm pretty good with strategy when playing. I don't need to practice strategy too much, I can just see things when I play. In a week, I only play games for about 2-3 hours, depending if I get out to my league and i do draws for about a total of an hour a week.
     
  17. duanojo

    duanojo New Member

    One thing that needs to be said more loudly if it hasn't been already:

    A good trainer is one who it's fun to play against. A good trainer respects his opponents, follows the rules, and shows regard for the game. A good trainer doesn't get down on him or her self or his or her opponent when they are losing in a game. After you've played a good trainer, you should feel good about the experience, whether you win or lose.

    You can have the best deck and have worked the hardest to protect it, but if you don't respect the game and fellow players, you're certainly not a good trainer.

    Also, good trainer should have some creativity, not just copying decks or stategies, but bringing something of his or her own style to the game. Plus, he or she should have really cool deck sleeves and damage counters/dice.
     
  18. Tyranitar666

    Tyranitar666 New Member

    Humility? Never heard of it. What pokemon has that attack?

    Anyways, Neo-Pets Broken Lizard? Heck no! Its ALL Wizards In Training for ME! :) Best Game EVER. Fold to it. NOW.
     
  19. SteveP

    SteveP Active Member

    Since you put "Good Trainer" in quotes, it could mean anything I guess. However, I tend to separate "Good Trainers" into 2 categories:

    1. Great Players - these people can take any decent deck and win consistantly with it, tweak it when the metagame changes, and successfully modify the strategies of the deck when confronted with obstacles such as weakness, counter effects, and occassional bad luck. Also, as I witnessed in a tournament today, great players have good Poker faces and bluffing skills.

    2. Great Deck Constructors - these people know the cards and can construct decks with winning strategies. For example, the person(s) who constructed the Entei/Magcargo deck in the midst of the Gatr dominance were great deck constructors.

    Occassionally, these two skills will abide in the same individual, making that person an even "Gooder Trainer."
     
  20. ausen

    ausen New Member

    It was the truth =\ Games are won and loss by their deckbuilding and by the player's ability to beat his opponent mentally. Playing out the game is a formality if you're good enough and made your deck right.

    Edit-I pm`ed you to keep the thread less cluttered.-`Sensei
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 25, 2004
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